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ITT: I USHER IN THE NEW POST-RSF XOXO GOLDEN WGWAG AGE (2018-

Mark your calendars folks, there are some EPIC things under ...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  01/28/18
WGWAG - From Korea to Norway
boyish nubile son of senegal
  01/28/18
How did you avoid military service, coward?
Stirring medicated nibblets mad cow disease
  01/28/18
...
Stirring medicated nibblets mad cow disease
  01/28/18
...
Stirring medicated nibblets mad cow disease
  01/28/18
...
Stirring medicated nibblets mad cow disease
  01/28/18
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Stirring medicated nibblets mad cow disease
  01/28/18
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Stirring medicated nibblets mad cow disease
  01/28/18
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Stirring medicated nibblets mad cow disease
  01/28/18
...
Stirring medicated nibblets mad cow disease
  01/28/18
this guy CHAEBONG DINGS
Soggy Box Office
  02/05/18
I dont have to serve. Im amazed people still ask me about it
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/05/18
Will you serve in the future maybe?
Sadistic jap kitchen
  02/05/18
Im a reservist. I have reservist training once a year until ...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/05/18
Valid answer
Godawful sanctuary potus
  02/19/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
it's because you're considered a raging pussy by 100% of poa...
Soggy Box Office
  02/05/18
they just jelly as fuuuuck that they cant laugh about me bei...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/05/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
Thread did not go the way this clitdick NOWAG expected
racy place of business
  02/06/18
...
Diverse tripping useless brakes
  02/15/18
...
Insanely creepy bawdyhouse toaster
  02/17/18
Wikipedia Search EditWatch this pageRead in another languag...
Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
Wikipedia Search EditWatch this pageRead in another languag...
Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
Wikipedia Search EditWatch this pageRead in another languag...
Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
...
Chocolate buck-toothed keepsake machete personal credit line
  01/28/18
and thats exactly what everyone said about my passport. just...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  01/28/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
All of your poasts suck and are the same 4 or 5 things you m...
bateful site
  01/28/18
if you track my posts you will already know what im referrin...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  01/28/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
lol
maize nursing home
  01/28/18
...
Chocolate buck-toothed keepsake machete personal credit line
  02/05/18
GAS yourself INSECTOID VIRGIN SUBHUMAN
ungodly dysfunction garrison
  01/28/18
It's coming, xoxo.
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/05/18
...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/06/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
Wikipedia Search EditWatch this pageRead in another languag...
Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
I'm going to lather your faggot waifu pillow with pot-ash an...
Soggy Box Office
  02/05/18
...
internet-worthy flirting knife laser beams
  02/05/18
Updated Post Above
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/15/18
Wikipedia Search EditWatch this pageRead in another languag...
Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
This thread is dedicated to Tommy Turdskin - may you find pe...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/15/18
The fact that you value white pussy so much reveals deep sea...
180 Property
  02/15/18
...
ungodly dysfunction garrison
  02/15/18
Rather this statement from you merely reveals your own insec...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/15/18
Tl:dr
180 Property
  02/15/18
All you need to know, cumskin dork, is that I will be balls ...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/15/18
(NOWAG that won’t close or even meet up with the 4 he’s been...
racy place of business
  02/15/18
Already creampied 2 Norwegian girls, friend. About to creamp...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/15/18
(NOWAG that hasn’t even spoken to a girl)
racy place of business
  02/15/18
RSF, I really love how you literally cannot even process the...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/15/18
Literally no one in the world would ever believe your clearl...
racy place of business
  02/15/18
Dont worry RSF I will post the proof pics in one post at the...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/15/18
(“Guy” who didn’t even speak to a single girl) No one bel...
racy place of business
  02/15/18
Oh btw I came here on my KOREAN PASSPORT. Devastating. Je...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/15/18
What unit did you serve in?
racy place of business
  02/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
Wikipedia Search EditWatch this pageRead in another languag...
Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
Your celebration of WGWAG is itself an implicit admission th...
Diverse tripping useless brakes
  02/15/18
Well he DID self deport due to crushing NOWAG
racy place of business
  02/15/18
The perception of Asian men is obviously lower. Which is why...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/15/18
Going to museums, eating alone, and writing NOWAG fan fictio...
Diverse tripping useless brakes
  02/15/18
I hope this NOWAG fraud at least went to the Fram and Con-Ti...
racy place of business
  02/15/18
That's the lulziest part of you cumskin dorks. I post the pr...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/15/18
No one doubts youre in Norway alone, nerd. Your evidence ...
Diverse tripping useless brakes
  02/15/18
Already posted proof pics, you little cumskin bitch. That's ...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/15/18
You forgot to link attachment. Pls resend. Thank.
Diverse tripping useless brakes
  02/15/18
...
Greedy Blathering University
  02/19/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
...
Insanely creepy bawdyhouse toaster
  02/17/18
tommy bump
boyish nubile son of senegal
  07/02/18
Wikipedia Search EditWatch this pageRead in another languag...
Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
19 year old hottie CONFIMRED for tonight
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/15/18
Wikipedia Search EditWatch this pageRead in another languag...
Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
Huge Viking cart:
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/15/18
Wikipedia Search EditWatch this pageRead in another languag...
Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
Bought a badass thorshammer for my necklace chain. Gonna roc...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/15/18
Painfully sad and in line with your dorky personality
racy place of business
  02/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
What happened to your foolproof plan for an Olympic village ...
big brindle temple community account
  02/15/18
This is a great question. Initially I had planned on doing t...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
SAD, where you at nigga? Still asleep?
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/15/18
...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/15/18
Wikipedia Search EditWatch this pageRead in another languag...
Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/16/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/18/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/19/18
Wikipedia Search EditWatch this pageRead in another languag...
Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
JJC where you at nigga? Sup cuz.
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/15/18
...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/16/18
Wikipedia Search EditWatch this pageRead in another languag...
Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/16/18
Wikipedia Search EditWatch this pageRead in another languag...
Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/18/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/15/18
Come on haters! Make up some bullshit excuses for how none o...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
NOWAG must have posted the wrong link. I was told there woul...
racy place of business
  02/15/18
AHAHAHAH RSF and his mangina groupies FURIOUS that NYUUG lit...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
I dont think this proves what you think it does
Diverse tripping useless brakes
  02/15/18
...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/16/18
Pederastrian FURIOUS as he jacks off to NYUUGs leftovers, wh...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/17/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
Almost 3 days since I posted this proof pic...where my hater...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/18/18
...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/18/18
Wikipedia Search EditWatch this pageRead in another languag...
Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
Wikipedia Search EditWatch this pageRead in another languag...
Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
19 year old EN ROUTE to my apartment #3, xoxo. gonna...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/15/18
Update: She came over, legit 8.5 IRL. She was kinda cra...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/16/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
New internet girl came over earlier this afternoon. Fooled a...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/16/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
Gameplan for final week in Oslo: Friday - University stud...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/16/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
wow nyuug this thread is really something
Rough-skinned bearded pisswyrm
  02/16/18
Ever been to Oslo?
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/16/18
I have, but I actually slept with hot Norwegian girls, unlik...
racy place of business
  02/16/18
2 so far, but I am perfectly fine with 2 Norwegian flags. I'...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/16/18
(“Guy” who meant to type “0”)
racy place of business
  02/16/18
Already posted proof pics, friend. RSF, you've already been ...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/16/18
lol @ that being “proof,” also odd you never post pictures o...
racy place of business
  02/16/18
Blame your psycho cumskin stalker brethren for that, friend....
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/16/18
LOL at anyone believing this pathetic lie. unless you pull t...
racy place of business
  02/16/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
Wikipedia Search EditWatch this pageRead in another languag...
Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
Lol at this thread so far. A pumo (probably rsf) blank bumps...
Cerise Church
  02/16/18
RSF straight up lied about me not being a Korean citizen, me...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/16/18
You straight up WERE NOT a Korean citizen. Odd case that you...
racy place of business
  02/16/18
You're a Korean citizen the moment you are born if your pare...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/16/18
Pretty sure you have to serve if you want to be a citizen an...
racy place of business
  02/16/18
Big Korean Cock balls deep in Norwegian cuties. Bitch.
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/16/18
(Cowardly NOWAG declared unfit for military service with a c...
racy place of business
  02/16/18
Wikipedia Search EditWatch this pageRead in another languag...
Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
Wikipedia Search EditWatch this pageRead in another languag...
Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
Wikipedia Search EditWatch this pageRead in another languag...
Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
We're all a little fucked in the head but his mental illness...
Cerise Church
  02/16/18
Wikipedia Search EditWatch this pageRead in another languag...
Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
what happened to the PyeongChang WGWAG Olympics?
mahogany school cafeteria
  02/16/18
I'll be back in Korea before the end of the games. Still ple...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/16/18
Asian Norwegian girl seems DTF but I'll have to be on my A-g...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/16/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
Story from Dinner Last Night With Norwegian Goddess
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/16/18
lol, you should have made fun of them in some way
mahogany school cafeteria
  02/16/18
Making fun of someone for their nationality IRL is something...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/16/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
Saved for Posterity's Sake
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/16/18
...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/18/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
really bad thread
maize nursing home
  02/16/18
U mad@ NYUUG creampieing Norwegian cuties?
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/16/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
NCChinesedood I remember your ass from back in the day....
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/16/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
dtp where you at
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/17/18
...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/18/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
Opera Bump Date: February 17th, 2018 2:40 AM Author: Ope...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/17/18
the sex. didn't realize i needed to spell it out.
tantric legal warrant
  02/17/18
Oh u mad a literal KOREAN ALPHA came to Norway itself and co...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/17/18
yeah, absolutely livid. just fuming over here.
tantric legal warrant
  02/17/18
Its ok Opera. Ive already posted the proof pics. Haters gon ...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/17/18
link to pix of you nutting in some 5'9" ice blonde 9.
tantric legal warrant
  02/17/18
its ok Opera. Right now my Nowegian university student is as...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/17/18
literally no one believes this.
tantric legal warrant
  02/17/18
I could literally take a picture of her asleep in my bed rig...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/17/18
take the pix.
tantric legal warrant
  02/17/18
Nope! LOVE the fact that I am literally going Genghis up in ...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/17/18
literally no one believes this.
tantric legal warrant
  02/17/18
When I get my third Norwegian flag Ill be sure to bump this ...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/17/18
good deal: looking forward to the reminder that literally n...
tantric legal warrant
  02/17/18
THEY SEE ME NORDIC WGWAGin...THEY HATIN
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/17/18
difficult to hate delusion.
tantric legal warrant
  02/17/18
Wikipedia Search EditWatch this pageRead in another languag...
Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
cr LMAO at nyuug trying to talk shit
glittery pocket flask
  02/17/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
Ghetto Norwegian breakfast is served:
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/17/18
nyuug this thread is as cringe-worthy as any you've ever mad...
glittery pocket flask
  02/17/18
Sometimes the cold nigga WGWAG truth hurts. I understand the...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/17/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
listen nyuug i'm one of the big dog __ accts. i'm not gonna ...
glittery pocket flask
  02/17/18
Love you too, friend.
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/17/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
So yesterday I went to the Folk Museum with my Norwegian coo...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/18/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
UPDATE: Asian Norwegian girl still in play for tonight ...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/18/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
Gameplan for today: OSLO BIGBRUNCH with my university gir...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/18/18
...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/18/18
DAT steak sandwich and baked salmon
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/18/18
WHERE MY HATERS AT. COME ON, MAKE UP SOME MORE LAME BULLSHIT...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/18/18
...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/18/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/18/18
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Demanding gold center
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...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/20/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
Just sent girl home. Gonna run some day game before I meet m...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/18/18
You're 30 years old and still doing this?
turquoise adventurous chapel
  02/18/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
New Norwegian girl CONFIRMED as backup for tonight: Day g...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/18/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
Asian Norwegian girl EN ROUTE
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/18/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
Fucked Asian Norwegian Girl. 3rd Norwegian flag. And shut...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/18/18
ADDENDUM - I actually felt so bad for sending this Asian Nor...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/18/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
REMA was closed but JOKER was open for business. Copped D...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/18/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
Gonna fire up DAT BLACK MIRROR. Sup xoxo.
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/18/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
RSF and NYUUG are the worst posters to ever happen to xo
rusted roommate station
  02/18/18
My NIGGA damn DADDY. Sup with you nigga.
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/18/18
180
rusted roommate station
  02/18/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
one eighty thread
bateful site
  02/18/18
They said a Korean man couldn't bring the WGWAG Banner into ...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/18/18
i want to rape you
bateful site
  02/18/18
Sorry dewd, not gay. But if you like Korean guys just cum...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/18/18
i dont care if youre gay i am going to pin you to the ground...
bateful site
  02/18/18
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Demanding gold center
  11/15/18
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The Pew Research Center estimated that 3.7% of Norwegians we...
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TO BEE FAIRE, Of course even Norway is fucked by the Is...
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no dude but why make this thread? lol btw do u use condom...
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COPPED DEM DIGITS from nearby coed:
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Asked her out to drinks. At 1 in the morning. And its Monday...
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Last week in Norway! Good morning from Oslo, Xoxo!
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/19/18
Basically have 2 days left here. Plan my last 2 days here...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/19/18
You took a one month vacation?
Sadistic jap kitchen
  02/19/18
2 weeks
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/19/18
Why does your January 28 post say you've been in Oslo for a ...
Sadistic jap kitchen
  02/19/18
(xoxo n00b)
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/19/18
(Chung+)
Sadistic jap kitchen
  02/19/18
Highly recommend visiting Oslo sometime. A great city.
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/19/18
What sites did you see? I'm a married man
Sadistic jap kitchen
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Pretty much everything there is to see in Oslo. I still n...
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Glorious.
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Do you think I'm lying about my conquests?
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Just matched with a Norwegian MILF. ...turns out shes i...
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Gonna head out early today to check out the Ski Museum. 180.
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  02/19/18
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Posting from the Ski Museum. This place is 180.
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Gave an XOXO shoutout in the Ski Museum Guestbook
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Might get my fourth Norwegian flag tonight. White Norwegian ...
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RSF = posts pictures of actual women NYUUG = pictures of te...
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http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&fo...
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Archived
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Asian Norwegian EN ROUTE. Gonna try to film it this time aww...
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Fucked Asian Norwegian girl again. Copped DAT post-fuck T...
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COME ON HATERS. TELL ME I PHOTOSHOPPED THIS ONE TOO
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...
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boyish nubile son of senegal
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NEARBY COED is EN ROUTE. AWWWWW YEAH.
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Just fucked nearby coed. Turns out she isn't Norwegian. B...
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WHERE YOU AT, NOWAG TROLLS?
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Good morning XOXO!
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  02/20/18
Gonna check out the MUNCH museum and then some last minute s...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/20/18
I, too, am curious how your father figures into all of this....
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Parents live stateside, yep.
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Getting ready to go back home by swiping in Seoul...so. many...
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Seeing A LOT of Ukrainians...what the fuck? Cant wait to me...
boyish nubile son of senegal
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A lot of Finns, Swedes, etc. This is crazy. Olympics brought...
boyish nubile son of senegal
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So the new "golden age" and future of xo is an unh...
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Soul-stirring Cream Dopamine Casino
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Dat Olympics pussy.
boyish nubile son of senegal
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Swiping in Seoul was fun. Hopefully I'll have a packed sched...
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At the National Gallery Museum - gonna see THE SCREAM. 180
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/20/18
Just arrived in Rm 19. 180^180
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/20/18
LOL complete and total NOWAG has destroyed your brain.
racy place of business
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Checked out of airbnb. Spending my last night with universit...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/20/18
Goodbye Oslo. Back to the fatherland. Will update you guys a...
boyish nubile son of senegal
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Chillin in Doha. Sup xoxo.
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/21/18
Already matched with a Norwegian girl while swiping in DOHA ...
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300 poast thread, 90 percent of them nyuug repetitively spam...
Cyan hunting ground
  02/21/18
No, he's 180, I hope he keeps posting about his baller adven...
chartreuse lay
  02/21/18
TITCR. This board has been insanely jealous and it shows. ...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/21/18
Do your fans a favor and post a guide on how you went from N...
chartreuse lay
  02/21/18
Did this when I unretired in 2015 after going on a XOXO sabb...
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There used to be a time when I posted uncensored pics. Then ...
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  02/21/18
Black out the bitch’s face then.I came here for titties at t...
Cyan hunting ground
  02/21/18
None of the Norwegian girls I fucked sent me naughty pics. ...
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  02/21/18
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LOL @ this pathetic lie 1. It is 1,000% IMPOSSIBLE for an...
racy place of business
  02/21/18
why are you bumping this gay faggot thread? no one else talk...
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  02/21/18
it was literally the thread on top of page 1 when I logged i...
racy place of business
  02/21/18
You seem mad and jelly.
chartreuse lay
  02/21/18
LJL
racy place of business
  02/21/18
TITCR. He is so furious that I went on my epic Norway WGW...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/21/18
(guy who didn't get laid in Norway, or ever)
racy place of business
  02/21/18
Matching with a bunch of white girls in Seoul for the WGWAG ...
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/21/18
Keep it up. You're gonna be working up a sweat this weekend....
chartreuse lay
  02/21/18
tyty. got a couple dates lined up for friday so well see
boyish nubile son of senegal
  02/21/18
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Final Thoughts on Norway
boyish nubile son of senegal
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Will bump this thread if anything Norway-related or WGWAG re...
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...
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NYUUG again a PROPHET http://xoxohth.com/thread.php?threa...
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...
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bedroom bully bump: http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?t...
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Posting on FREE SUPER WIFI in the air. Almost back in the fa...
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  02/22/18
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Arriving soon. Flight attendants handing out immigration car...
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ENTERED KOREA WITH MY KOREAN PASSPORT PWN PWN PWN
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  02/22/18
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A week out and I miss Norway already. Been getting into VIKI...
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nobody gives a fuck about your pathetic life
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singapore bump
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Bro i really enjoy your insane will to power schtick bit can...
Mewling reading party
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how? the board needs a wgwag savior
boyish nubile son of senegal
  07/02/18
The WGWAG and posting from a 3rd world country shit is funny...
Mewling reading party
  07/02/18
hmmm. will be tough trying to take my posting in a new direc...
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  07/02/18
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i miss oslo
boyish nubile son of senegal
  01/14/20
Jfc RSF
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Poast new message in this thread



Reply Favorite

Date: January 28th, 2018 9:27 PM
Author: boyish nubile son of senegal

Mark your calendars folks, there are some EPIC things under way for next month.

It shall be a glorious Golden WGWAG Era of XOXO the likes of which the board has never seen. Mark my words, bitches.

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35264314)



Reply Favorite

Date: January 28th, 2018 9:30 PM
Author: boyish nubile son of senegal
Subject: WGWAG - From Korea to Norway

NYUUG here checking in from Oslo.

I have been in Oslo for a full week now. I have a couple thoughts I would like to share.

First and foremost, Norway is a beautiful land. With beautiful people. The women are beautiful in a classy, raw way. Not caked with makeup like Korean girls but healthy, elegant, and very Scandinavian.

A very interesting note here: Norwegians are not tall. There are a lot of tall men here, but there are plenty of short men here as well. Clearly, the average Norwegian man is a couple cms taller than their Korean counterparts but as a 177cm Korean male walking around the streets, I feel just around average height here. And certainly more jacked than the average Norwegian man. Although that could be because I wear only a t-shirt whereas Norwegian men all seem to wear long sleeve shirts.

Before arriving in Oslo I had been talking to a Norwegian girl in university I met online for several months. I got an airbnb just in case she flaked out but sure enough, she showed up at Sentral Station and I was lovestruck. A truly amazing display of Nordic beauty - solid 178 barefoot with blonde hair and blue eyes.

That first night I stayed with her at her apartment after I took her to - surprise! - the only Korean restaurant in Oslo, ironically called "Gangnam".

It was an incredible experience. She was the first Norwegian girl I had been with. I had fulfilled my WGWAG destiny as a Korean male and made the journey into the heart of the most superior of nordic genetics.

The next few days we hung out and went to different places in Oslo and she is currently traveling abroad and I will see her again when she comes back to Norway.

But the journey was not complete. I told myself that making love to a Norwegian woman who I had met prior to arriving in Norway was a respectable feat. But successfully meeting a Norwegian beauty AFTER already arriving was the only way to truly have conquered.

And so I met a beautiful Nordic goddess online a few days ago. I had gone to a Cannibal Corpse concert - which I will come back to later - and went to Grunnerlokka to drink afterwards.

As I was having a drink, I got a text from my goddess and we planned to meet up the next evening. I didn't expect much because I had already struck out on some coffee dates with other Norwegian girls but she showed up to the Hotel Sky Bar and there was instant chemistry.

I didn't believe it was possible but this goddess was even more beautiful than the university student. Although she was shorter, she had beautiful blue eyes and a perfect face. Absolutely stunning facial features. I suspect this was due to her being from the northern part of Norway. All smiles, very touchy and just a great personality overall. So sweet.

After a couple drinks at the hotel bar, we went across the street back to my apartment and made love. I creampied the university student and I creampied this goddess as well.

We cuddled and she slept over. It was a truly surreal experience. It felt as if everything good, just, and right in the universe shot through my body and into her when I made love to her. I really can't describe the feeling.

Last night was Valentines Day so I wasn't expecting to meet the goddess. I had already made plans to visit some bars and hunt just in case the date didn't go well, but the universe had a different fate in store for me. I held off from making this thread until I successfully met a Norwegian girl after arriving. Now I can share my stories.

I sent her home a couple hours ago and if everything goes well I will be meeting another absolute beauty this afternoon. Did I mention she is only 19 years old? I am hoping for the best.

I will be visiting the Viking Ship museum during the day and hopefully will meet some other beauties this weekend. It's only Thursday and I will be in town for another week.

For those of you interested in the Cannibal Corpse concert, I went to their show at Parkteatret and met some really cool people there:

Of course, I got some SICK CC merch as well:

CC may be was the only band I had not been able to see live and they KILLED it. Corpsegrinder is sick. Black Dahlia Murder...I had already seen them years ago and they were OK.

It was the first show I had been to in almost 10 years. I felt like I was going back to my NYU UG roots. Amazing.

Earlier that day I had also visited Helvete, home to Noseblood Records, the infamous home of Norwegian Black Metal.

They had some crazy stuff there and I got some SICK patches which I will be using to make a new kutte when I go back to Korea:

Crazily enough, CC had visited the store several hours before I did and left a message on the Helvete guestbook. So of course, I had to give the board a shoutout on the same page:

After being here for a week I can truly say that I have experienced the best of what Norway has to offer.

Beautiful women, a beautiful city, and an amazing Nordic experience that virtually no Korean man alive today will be able to replicate.

With a week to go I have set one final goal for myself before leaving this beautiful country: a successful hunt.

I haven't been hitting the bars this first week because I have been focusing on logistics and online game but I am ready to go out and meet more Norwegian beauties organically and bring one home.

The WGWAG Legend Lives On.

HTFH, XOXO.

ADDENDUM - if there are any posters in Oslo, or around here, id be more than happy to meet up

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35264342)



Reply Favorite

Date: January 28th, 2018 9:32 PM
Author: Stirring medicated nibblets mad cow disease

How did you avoid military service, coward?

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35264370)



Reply Favorite

Date: January 28th, 2018 9:34 PM
Author: Stirring medicated nibblets mad cow disease



(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35264397)



Reply Favorite

Date: January 28th, 2018 9:35 PM
Author: Stirring medicated nibblets mad cow disease



(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35264398)



Reply Favorite

Date: January 28th, 2018 9:35 PM
Author: Stirring medicated nibblets mad cow disease



(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35264400)



Reply Favorite

Date: January 28th, 2018 9:35 PM
Author: Stirring medicated nibblets mad cow disease



(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35264401)



Reply Favorite

Date: January 28th, 2018 9:35 PM
Author: Stirring medicated nibblets mad cow disease



(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35264402)



Reply Favorite

Date: January 28th, 2018 9:35 PM
Author: Stirring medicated nibblets mad cow disease



(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35264404)



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Date: January 28th, 2018 9:35 PM
Author: Stirring medicated nibblets mad cow disease



(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35264406)



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Date: February 5th, 2018 12:53 AM
Author: Soggy Box Office

this guy CHAEBONG DINGS

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35326489)



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Date: February 5th, 2018 12:53 AM
Author: boyish nubile son of senegal

I dont have to serve. Im amazed people still ask me about it

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35326492)



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Date: February 5th, 2018 12:54 AM
Author: Sadistic jap kitchen

Will you serve in the future maybe?

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35326495)



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Date: February 5th, 2018 12:56 AM
Author: boyish nubile son of senegal

Im a reservist. I have reservist training once a year until I'm 50

In the event of a war I am obligated to serve as an active duty solider.

But if youre asking whether Ill serve 2 years as an active duty soldier aside from the aforementioned scenario? No



(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35326520)



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Date: February 19th, 2018 1:56 AM
Author: Godawful sanctuary potus

Valid answer

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35435244)



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Date: November 15th, 2018 1:11 AM
Author: Demanding gold center

Wikipedia Search

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

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^ a b Lee, Namhee (2007). The Making of Minjung: Democracy and the Politics of Representation in South Korea. Cornell University Press. p. 91. ISBN 0801445663.

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^ "Constitution of the Republic of Korea" (PDF). 1987. p. 12. Retrieved 2017-12-27.

^ Kim, Jongcheol (2012). "Constitutional Law". Introduction to Korean Law. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 78. ISBN 3642316891.

^ a b "Military Service Act, Article 8". Korean Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

^ "History". Military Manpower Administration. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

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^ "Military Service Act, Articles 10-14". Korean Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

^ Lent, Jesse (2016-04-01). "'Descendants Of The Sun' Star Song Joong Ki Discusses His Time In The South Korean Army". Korea Portal. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

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^ "Military Service Act, Articles 26-43". Korea Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "Conscription 'Should Be Phased Out Slowly'". Chosun Ilbo. 2010-07-06. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ Kim, Christine (2010-12-22). "Plan to cut compulsory military service scrapped". Korea JoongAng Daily. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "์ œ68์กฐ์˜11(์˜ˆ์ˆ ใ†์ฒด์œก์š”์›์˜ ์ถ”์ฒœ ๋“ฑ) [Article 68-11: Recommendation of arts and sports personnel, etc.]". ๋ณ‘์—ญ๋ฒ• ์‹œํ–‰๋ น [Military Service Act Implementation Rules]. South Korea: Ministry of Government Legislation. 29 November 2016. Retrieved 6 April 2018. ๋ฒ• ์ œ33์กฐ์˜7์ œ1ํ•ญ ์ „๋‹จ์—์„œ "๋Œ€ํ†ต๋ น๋ น์œผ๋กœ ์ •ํ•˜๋Š” ์˜ˆ์ˆ ·์ฒด์œก ๋ถ„์•ผ์˜ ํŠน๊ธฐ๋ฅผ ๊ฐ€์ง„ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ"์ด๋ž€ ๋‹ค์Œ ๊ฐ ํ˜ธ์˜ ์–ด๋Š ํ•˜๋‚˜์— ํ•ด๋‹นํ•˜๋Š” ์‚ฌ๋žŒ์„ ๋งํ•œ๋‹ค. ... 4. ์˜ฌ๋ฆผํ”ฝ๋Œ€ํšŒ์—์„œ 3์œ„ ์ด์ƒ์œผ๋กœ ์ž…์ƒํ•œ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ(๋‹จ์ฒด๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ์ข…๋ชฉ์˜ ๊ฒฝ์šฐ์—๋Š” ์‹ค์ œ๋กœ ์ถœ์ „ํ•œ ์„ ์ˆ˜๋งŒ ํ•ด๋‹นํ•œ๋‹ค) 5. ์•„์‹œ์•„๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ๋Œ€ํšŒ์—์„œ 1์œ„๋กœ ์ž…์ƒํ•œ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ(๋‹จ์ฒด๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ์ข…๋ชฉ์˜ ๊ฒฝ์šฐ์—๋Š” ์‹ค์ œ๋กœ ์ถœ์ „ํ•œ ์„ ์ˆ˜๋งŒ ํ•ด๋‹นํ•œ๋‹ค). [In Article 33, Paragraph 7, Subparagraph 2 of the Act, 'a person having special talents in arts and athletics fields, as defined by presidential order' refers to persons to whom are applicable any one of the provisions of the following subparagraphs. ... 4. A person who received a prize for ranked third or above at the Olympics (in the case of team events, only applicable to athletes who actually participated). 5. A person who received a prize for ranking first at the Asian Games (in the case of team events, only applicable to athletes who actually participated).]

^ "๋ฆฌ์šฐ์—์„œ๋„ ๋– ์˜ค๋ฅธ ์ถ•๊ตฌ๋Œ€ํ‘œํŒ€ '๋ณ‘์—ญํŠน๋ก€'".

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^ "๋“ค์ญ‰๋‚ ์ญ‰ ๋ณ‘์—ญํŠน๋ก€๊ธฐ์ค€ 'ํ˜•ํ‰์„ฑ' ๋…ผ๋ž€๏ฟฝ๋ณ‘๋ฌด์ฒญ '๋ˆ„์ ์ ์ˆ˜์ œ' ์ถ”์ง„" (in Korean). Yonhap News Agency. September 30, 2016.

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^ "Hyeon Chung Participates In Korean Military Training - ATP World Tour - Tennis - ATP World Tour - Tennis".

^ ๊ณต๋ฌด์›๋ณด์ˆ˜๊ทœ์ • '๋ณ„ํ‘œ 13' ๊ตฐ์ธ์˜ ๋ด‰๊ธ‰ํ‘œ(์ œ5์กฐ ๋ฐ ๋ณ„ํ‘œ 1 ๊ด€๋ จ) . Korea Ministry of Government Legislation (in Korean). Retrieved 28 April 2015.

^ ์กฐ, ๊ธฐํ˜ธ (18 July 2012). "์šด๋™ํ™” ํ•œ ์ผค๋ ˆ ๋ชป ์ฃผ๋Š” ๊ตฐ(่ป)!". Seoul Broadcasting System. Retrieved 4 August 2012.

^ "[๋ณด๋„์ž๋ฃŒ] ์˜ˆ์‚ฐ ์—†๋‹ค๋˜ ๊ตญ๋ฐฉ๋ถ€, ์‚ฌ๊ด€์ƒ๋„์—๊ฒŒ๋Š” ๊ณ ๊ฐ€ ์™ธ๊ตญ๋ธŒ๋žœ๋“œ ์šด๋™ํ™” ์ง€๊ธ‰". Retrieved 4 August 2012.[dead link]

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^ Seo, Ji-eun "Steve Yoo isn๏ฟฝt coming back to Korea" Archived 6 January 2013 at the Wayback Machine. Joongang Daily. 20 October 2011. retrieved 2011-11-08

^ (in Korean) "์ตœ์ง€์šฐ, '์Šนํ—Œ์ด์—๊ฒŒ ๋ง ๊ฑธ์–ด๋ณผ๊นŒ?"[permanent dead link] SSTV. 30 June 2009. Retrieved 2011-11-06

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^ "High-Paid Actor Exempted from Draft for Poverty". The Chosun Ilbo. 22 June 2012. Retrieved 2012-10-06.

^ Moon, Gwang-lip (25 June 2012). "Agent says Kim Moo-yul's family situation was 'nearly impossible'". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 11 August 2012. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ Sunwoo, Carla (10 July 2012). "Kim Moo-yul kicked off movie set". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 26 January 2013. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ Sunwoo, Carla (11 July 2012). "Choi Daniel to replace Kim Moo-yul". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 5 August 2012. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ Lee, Hye-ji (5 October 2012). "Kim Moo-yeol to Enter Army, Cleaning out Exemption Rumors". 10Asia. Retrieved 2012-11-18.

^ Sunwoo, Carla (11 October 2011). "Kim Moo-yul enlists after rumors". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 26 October 2012. Retrieved 18 November 2012.

^ "BIGBANG's T.O.P confirms military enlistment date". Yibada. November 22, 2016.

^ "The Full Story Behind T.O.P's Drug Scandal, And The Mysterious Trainee Woman". June 2, 2017. Retrieved June 8, 2017.

^ Jun, R. "BIGBANG's T.O.P To Be Dismissed From Duty For Duration of Prosecution". Soompi. Retrieved 8 June 2017.

^ "Medical expert comments on T.O.P's benzodiazepine overdose | allkpop.com". allkpop. Retrieved 2017-06-09.

^ "BIGBANG's T.O.P hospitalized for drug overdose". YonhapNews. June 6, 2017. Retrieved June 6, 2017.

^ "K-pop superstar T.O.P. in intensive care after overdose". BBC. June 8, 2017. Retrieved June 28, 2017.

^ Kim Jung-kyoon (June 30, 2017). "T.O.P admits to all charges at first hearing". Korea JoongAng Daily. Retrieved July 19, 2017.

^ "Big Bang's T.O.P pleads guilty to pot charges". The Jakarta Post. June 30, 2017. Retrieved 2017-07-19.

^ Park Hyeong-taek (June 29, 2017). "[SCํ˜„์žฅ] ํƒ‘, ๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ 4ํšŒ ํก์—ฐ ์‹œ์ธ๏ฟฝ"๊ณต์†Œ์‚ฌ์‹ค ๋ชจ๋‘ ์ธ์ •"" [[SC scene] Top, smoking four po ... "All the facts of the charges"]. Sports Chosun (in Korean). Retrieved July 19, 2017.

^ Riddhiman Mukhopadhyay (July 20, 2017). "Rapper T.O.P sentenced at final trial: Apologizes to fans for his actions". International Business Times. Retrieved July 21, 2017.

^ "(LEAD) BIGBANG's T.O.P. gets suspended sentence for marijuana use". Yonhap News Agency. July 20, 2017. Retrieved July 20, 2017.

^ "๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์žฌ๋ณต๋ฌด์‹ฌ์‚ฌ์—์„œ ๋ถ€์ ํ•ฉ ๊ฒฐ๋ก ๏ฟฝ ์˜๊ฒฝ์‹ ๋ถ„ ๋ฐ•ํƒˆ" [Big Bang tower is inadequate in re-examination ... Deprivation of state]. Sports Chosun (in Korean). July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "BIGBANG's T.O.P to lose police post after drug conviction". Yonhap News Agency. July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ ์‹ ๋ถ„ ๋ฐ•ํƒˆ '์žฌ๋ณต๋ฌด ์‹ฌ์‚ฌ์„œ ๋ถ€์ ํ•ฉ ํŒ์ •'" [Top, disqualification of state of rehabilitation]. Starin E-Daily (in Korean). July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "BigBang rapper T.O.P cannot continue serving military duty as a policeman". Starits Times. July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

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^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

Exter

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#37236272)



Reply Favorite

Date: February 5th, 2018 12:54 AM
Author: Soggy Box Office

it's because you're considered a raging pussy by 100% of poasters for not doing it

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35326498)



Reply Favorite

Date: February 5th, 2018 12:57 AM
Author: boyish nubile son of senegal

they just jelly as fuuuuck that they cant laugh about me being forced into active duty

and i shit on these haters every day.

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35326530)



Reply Favorite

Date: November 15th, 2018 1:12 AM
Author: Demanding gold center

Wikipedia Search

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

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^ a b Lee, Namhee (2007). The Making of Minjung: Democracy and the Politics of Representation in South Korea. Cornell University Press. p. 91. ISBN 0801445663.

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^ Kim, Jongcheol (2012). "Constitutional Law". Introduction to Korean Law. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 78. ISBN 3642316891.

^ a b "Military Service Act, Article 8". Korean Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

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^ Kim, Christine (2010-12-22). "Plan to cut compulsory military service scrapped". Korea JoongAng Daily. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "์ œ68์กฐ์˜11(์˜ˆ์ˆ ใ†์ฒด์œก์š”์›์˜ ์ถ”์ฒœ ๋“ฑ) [Article 68-11: Recommendation of arts and sports personnel, etc.]". ๋ณ‘์—ญ๋ฒ• ์‹œํ–‰๋ น [Military Service Act Implementation Rules]. South Korea: Ministry of Government Legislation. 29 November 2016. Retrieved 6 April 2018. ๋ฒ• ์ œ33์กฐ์˜7์ œ1ํ•ญ ์ „๋‹จ์—์„œ "๋Œ€ํ†ต๋ น๋ น์œผ๋กœ ์ •ํ•˜๋Š” ์˜ˆ์ˆ ·์ฒด์œก ๋ถ„์•ผ์˜ ํŠน๊ธฐ๋ฅผ ๊ฐ€์ง„ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ"์ด๋ž€ ๋‹ค์Œ ๊ฐ ํ˜ธ์˜ ์–ด๋Š ํ•˜๋‚˜์— ํ•ด๋‹นํ•˜๋Š” ์‚ฌ๋žŒ์„ ๋งํ•œ๋‹ค. ... 4. ์˜ฌ๋ฆผํ”ฝ๋Œ€ํšŒ์—์„œ 3์œ„ ์ด์ƒ์œผ๋กœ ์ž…์ƒํ•œ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ(๋‹จ์ฒด๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ์ข…๋ชฉ์˜ ๊ฒฝ์šฐ์—๋Š” ์‹ค์ œ๋กœ ์ถœ์ „ํ•œ ์„ ์ˆ˜๋งŒ ํ•ด๋‹นํ•œ๋‹ค) 5. ์•„์‹œ์•„๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ๋Œ€ํšŒ์—์„œ 1์œ„๋กœ ์ž…์ƒํ•œ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ(๋‹จ์ฒด๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ์ข…๋ชฉ์˜ ๊ฒฝ์šฐ์—๋Š” ์‹ค์ œ๋กœ ์ถœ์ „ํ•œ ์„ ์ˆ˜๋งŒ ํ•ด๋‹นํ•œ๋‹ค). [In Article 33, Paragraph 7, Subparagraph 2 of the Act, 'a person having special talents in arts and athletics fields, as defined by presidential order' refers to persons to whom are applicable any one of the provisions of the following subparagraphs. ... 4. A person who received a prize for ranked third or above at the Olympics (in the case of team events, only applicable to athletes who actually participated). 5. A person who received a prize for ranking first at the Asian Games (in the case of team events, only applicable to athletes who actually participated).]

^ "๋ฆฌ์šฐ์—์„œ๋„ ๋– ์˜ค๋ฅธ ์ถ•๊ตฌ๋Œ€ํ‘œํŒ€ '๋ณ‘์—ญํŠน๋ก€'".

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^ "๋“ค์ญ‰๋‚ ์ญ‰ ๋ณ‘์—ญํŠน๋ก€๊ธฐ์ค€ 'ํ˜•ํ‰์„ฑ' ๋…ผ๋ž€๏ฟฝ๋ณ‘๋ฌด์ฒญ '๋ˆ„์ ์ ์ˆ˜์ œ' ์ถ”์ง„" (in Korean). Yonhap News Agency. September 30, 2016.

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^ ๊ณต๋ฌด์›๋ณด์ˆ˜๊ทœ์ • '๋ณ„ํ‘œ 13' ๊ตฐ์ธ์˜ ๋ด‰๊ธ‰ํ‘œ(์ œ5์กฐ ๋ฐ ๋ณ„ํ‘œ 1 ๊ด€๋ จ) . Korea Ministry of Government Legislation (in Korean). Retrieved 28 April 2015.

^ ์กฐ, ๊ธฐํ˜ธ (18 July 2012). "์šด๋™ํ™” ํ•œ ์ผค๋ ˆ ๋ชป ์ฃผ๋Š” ๊ตฐ(่ป)!". Seoul Broadcasting System. Retrieved 4 August 2012.

^ "[๋ณด๋„์ž๋ฃŒ] ์˜ˆ์‚ฐ ์—†๋‹ค๋˜ ๊ตญ๋ฐฉ๋ถ€, ์‚ฌ๊ด€์ƒ๋„์—๊ฒŒ๋Š” ๊ณ ๊ฐ€ ์™ธ๊ตญ๋ธŒ๋žœ๋“œ ์šด๋™ํ™” ์ง€๊ธ‰". Retrieved 4 August 2012.[dead link]

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^ Sunwoo, Carla (11 October 2011). "Kim Moo-yul enlists after rumors". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 26 October 2012. Retrieved 18 November 2012.

^ "BIGBANG's T.O.P confirms military enlistment date". Yibada. November 22, 2016.

^ "The Full Story Behind T.O.P's Drug Scandal, And The Mysterious Trainee Woman". June 2, 2017. Retrieved June 8, 2017.

^ Jun, R. "BIGBANG's T.O.P To Be Dismissed From Duty For Duration of Prosecution". Soompi. Retrieved 8 June 2017.

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^ Park Hyeong-taek (June 29, 2017). "[SCํ˜„์žฅ] ํƒ‘, ๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ 4ํšŒ ํก์—ฐ ์‹œ์ธ๏ฟฝ"๊ณต์†Œ์‚ฌ์‹ค ๋ชจ๋‘ ์ธ์ •"" [[SC scene] Top, smoking four po ... "All the facts of the charges"]. Sports Chosun (in Korean). Retrieved July 19, 2017.

^ Riddhiman Mukhopadhyay (July 20, 2017). "Rapper T.O.P sentenced at final trial: Apologizes to fans for his actions". International Business Times. Retrieved July 21, 2017.

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^ "๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์žฌ๋ณต๋ฌด์‹ฌ์‚ฌ์—์„œ ๋ถ€์ ํ•ฉ ๊ฒฐ๋ก ๏ฟฝ ์˜๊ฒฝ์‹ ๋ถ„ ๋ฐ•ํƒˆ" [Big Bang tower is inadequate in re-examination ... Deprivation of state]. Sports Chosun (in Korean). July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "BIGBANG's T.O.P to lose police post after drug conviction". Yonhap News Agency. July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ ์‹ ๋ถ„ ๋ฐ•ํƒˆ '์žฌ๋ณต๋ฌด ์‹ฌ์‚ฌ์„œ ๋ถ€์ ํ•ฉ ํŒ์ •'" [Top, disqualification of state of rehabilitation]. Starin E-Daily (in Korean). July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "BigBang rapper T.O.P cannot continue serving military duty as a policeman". Starits Times. July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

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^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

Exter

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Date: November 15th, 2018 1:18 AM
Author: Demanding gold center

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

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^ "๋ฆฌ์šฐ์—์„œ๋„ ๋– ์˜ค๋ฅธ ์ถ•๊ตฌ๋Œ€ํ‘œํŒ€ '๋ณ‘์—ญํŠน๋ก€'".

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^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

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^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

Exter

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#37236311)



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Date: February 6th, 2018 6:11 AM
Author: racy place of business

Thread did not go the way this clitdick NOWAG expected

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35336512)



Reply Favorite

Date: February 15th, 2018 9:52 AM
Author: Diverse tripping useless brakes



(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35408224)



Reply Favorite

Date: February 17th, 2018 3:48 AM
Author: Insanely creepy bawdyhouse toaster



(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35423132)



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Date: November 15th, 2018 1:10 AM
Author: Demanding gold center

Wikipedia Search

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

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^ a b Lee, Namhee (2007). The Making of Minjung: Democracy and the Politics of Representation in South Korea. Cornell University Press. p. 91. ISBN 0801445663.

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^ "Constitution of the Republic of Korea" (PDF). 1987. p. 12. Retrieved 2017-12-27.

^ Kim, Jongcheol (2012). "Constitutional Law". Introduction to Korean Law. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 78. ISBN 3642316891.

^ a b "Military Service Act, Article 8". Korean Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

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^ "Military Service Act, Articles 10-14". Korean Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

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^ "Conscription 'Should Be Phased Out Slowly'". Chosun Ilbo. 2010-07-06. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ Kim, Christine (2010-12-22). "Plan to cut compulsory military service scrapped". Korea JoongAng Daily. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "์ œ68์กฐ์˜11(์˜ˆ์ˆ ใ†์ฒด์œก์š”์›์˜ ์ถ”์ฒœ ๋“ฑ) [Article 68-11: Recommendation of arts and sports personnel, etc.]". ๋ณ‘์—ญ๋ฒ• ์‹œํ–‰๋ น [Military Service Act Implementation Rules]. South Korea: Ministry of Government Legislation. 29 November 2016. Retrieved 6 April 2018. ๋ฒ• ์ œ33์กฐ์˜7์ œ1ํ•ญ ์ „๋‹จ์—์„œ "๋Œ€ํ†ต๋ น๋ น์œผ๋กœ ์ •ํ•˜๋Š” ์˜ˆ์ˆ ·์ฒด์œก ๋ถ„์•ผ์˜ ํŠน๊ธฐ๋ฅผ ๊ฐ€์ง„ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ"์ด๋ž€ ๋‹ค์Œ ๊ฐ ํ˜ธ์˜ ์–ด๋Š ํ•˜๋‚˜์— ํ•ด๋‹นํ•˜๋Š” ์‚ฌ๋žŒ์„ ๋งํ•œ๋‹ค. ... 4. ์˜ฌ๋ฆผํ”ฝ๋Œ€ํšŒ์—์„œ 3์œ„ ์ด์ƒ์œผ๋กœ ์ž…์ƒํ•œ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ(๋‹จ์ฒด๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ์ข…๋ชฉ์˜ ๊ฒฝ์šฐ์—๋Š” ์‹ค์ œ๋กœ ์ถœ์ „ํ•œ ์„ ์ˆ˜๋งŒ ํ•ด๋‹นํ•œ๋‹ค) 5. ์•„์‹œ์•„๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ๋Œ€ํšŒ์—์„œ 1์œ„๋กœ ์ž…์ƒํ•œ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ(๋‹จ์ฒด๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ์ข…๋ชฉ์˜ ๊ฒฝ์šฐ์—๋Š” ์‹ค์ œ๋กœ ์ถœ์ „ํ•œ ์„ ์ˆ˜๋งŒ ํ•ด๋‹นํ•œ๋‹ค). [In Article 33, Paragraph 7, Subparagraph 2 of the Act, 'a person having special talents in arts and athletics fields, as defined by presidential order' refers to persons to whom are applicable any one of the provisions of the following subparagraphs. ... 4. A person who received a prize for ranked third or above at the Olympics (in the case of team events, only applicable to athletes who actually participated). 5. A person who received a prize for ranking first at the Asian Games (in the case of team events, only applicable to athletes who actually participated).]

^ "๋ฆฌ์šฐ์—์„œ๋„ ๋– ์˜ค๋ฅธ ์ถ•๊ตฌ๋Œ€ํ‘œํŒ€ '๋ณ‘์—ญํŠน๋ก€'".

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^ ๊ณต๋ฌด์›๋ณด์ˆ˜๊ทœ์ • '๋ณ„ํ‘œ 13' ๊ตฐ์ธ์˜ ๋ด‰๊ธ‰ํ‘œ(์ œ5์กฐ ๋ฐ ๋ณ„ํ‘œ 1 ๊ด€๋ จ) . Korea Ministry of Government Legislation (in Korean). Retrieved 28 April 2015.

^ ์กฐ, ๊ธฐํ˜ธ (18 July 2012). "์šด๋™ํ™” ํ•œ ์ผค๋ ˆ ๋ชป ์ฃผ๋Š” ๊ตฐ(่ป)!". Seoul Broadcasting System. Retrieved 4 August 2012.

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^ Park Hyeong-taek (June 29, 2017). "[SCํ˜„์žฅ] ํƒ‘, ๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ 4ํšŒ ํก์—ฐ ์‹œ์ธ๏ฟฝ"๊ณต์†Œ์‚ฌ์‹ค ๋ชจ๋‘ ์ธ์ •"" [[SC scene] Top, smoking four po ... "All the facts of the charges"]. Sports Chosun (in Korean). Retrieved July 19, 2017.

^ Riddhiman Mukhopadhyay (July 20, 2017). "Rapper T.O.P sentenced at final trial: Apologizes to fans for his actions". International Business Times. Retrieved July 21, 2017.

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^ "ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ ์‹ ๋ถ„ ๋ฐ•ํƒˆ '์žฌ๋ณต๋ฌด ์‹ฌ์‚ฌ์„œ ๋ถ€์ ํ•ฉ ํŒ์ •'" [Top, disqualification of state of rehabilitation]. Starin E-Daily (in Korean). July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "BigBang rapper T.O.P cannot continue serving military duty as a policeman". Starits Times. July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

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^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

Exter

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Date: November 15th, 2018 1:10 AM
Author: Demanding gold center

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

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^ "๋ฆฌ์šฐ์—์„œ๋„ ๋– ์˜ค๋ฅธ ์ถ•๊ตฌ๋Œ€ํ‘œํŒ€ '๋ณ‘์—ญํŠน๋ก€'".

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^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

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^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

Exter

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Date: November 15th, 2018 1:09 AM
Author: Demanding gold center

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

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^ "๋ฆฌ์šฐ์—์„œ๋„ ๋– ์˜ค๋ฅธ ์ถ•๊ตฌ๋Œ€ํ‘œํŒ€ '๋ณ‘์—ญํŠน๋ก€'".

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^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

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^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

Exter

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Date: November 15th, 2018 1:10 AM
Author: Demanding gold center

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

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^ "๋ฆฌ์šฐ์—์„œ๋„ ๋– ์˜ค๋ฅธ ์ถ•๊ตฌ๋Œ€ํ‘œํŒ€ '๋ณ‘์—ญํŠน๋ก€'".

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^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

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^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

Exter

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#37236265)



Reply Favorite

Date: January 28th, 2018 9:32 PM
Author: Chocolate buck-toothed keepsake machete personal credit line



(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35264366)



Reply Favorite

Date: January 28th, 2018 9:33 PM
Author: boyish nubile son of senegal

and thats exactly what everyone said about my passport. just wait until next month. youll see soon enough :)

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35264373)



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Date: November 15th, 2018 1:10 AM
Author: Demanding gold center

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

^ "๋ณ‘์—ญ์ดํ–‰์•ˆ๋‚ด - ๊ฐœ์š”(์ด๊ด„)" [Military Service Implementation Guide - General Overview]. Military Manpower Organization (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-12-28.

^ a b Lee, Namhee (2007). The Making of Minjung: Democracy and the Politics of Representation in South Korea. Cornell University Press. p. 91. ISBN 0801445663.

^ "S. Korea to expand women's role in military". Yonhap News Agency. 2017-12-20. Retrieved 2017-12-28.

^ "Constitution of the Republic of Korea" (PDF). 1987. p. 12. Retrieved 2017-12-27.

^ Kim, Jongcheol (2012). "Constitutional Law". Introduction to Korean Law. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 78. ISBN 3642316891.

^ a b "Military Service Act, Article 8". Korean Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

^ "History". Military Manpower Administration. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

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^ "Military Service Act, Articles 10-14". Korean Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

^ Lent, Jesse (2016-04-01). "'Descendants Of The Sun' Star Song Joong Ki Discusses His Time In The South Korean Army". Korea Portal. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "Military Service Act, Article 18". Korea Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "Military Service Act, Articles 26-43". Korea Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "Conscription 'Should Be Phased Out Slowly'". Chosun Ilbo. 2010-07-06. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ Kim, Christine (2010-12-22). "Plan to cut compulsory military service scrapped". Korea JoongAng Daily. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "์ œ68์กฐ์˜11(์˜ˆ์ˆ ใ†์ฒด์œก์š”์›์˜ ์ถ”์ฒœ ๋“ฑ) [Article 68-11: Recommendation of arts and sports personnel, etc.]". ๋ณ‘์—ญ๋ฒ• ์‹œํ–‰๋ น [Military Service Act Implementation Rules]. South Korea: Ministry of Government Legislation. 29 November 2016. Retrieved 6 April 2018. ๋ฒ• ์ œ33์กฐ์˜7์ œ1ํ•ญ ์ „๋‹จ์—์„œ "๋Œ€ํ†ต๋ น๋ น์œผ๋กœ ์ •ํ•˜๋Š” ์˜ˆ์ˆ ·์ฒด์œก ๋ถ„์•ผ์˜ ํŠน๊ธฐ๋ฅผ ๊ฐ€์ง„ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ"์ด๋ž€ ๋‹ค์Œ ๊ฐ ํ˜ธ์˜ ์–ด๋Š ํ•˜๋‚˜์— ํ•ด๋‹นํ•˜๋Š” ์‚ฌ๋žŒ์„ ๋งํ•œ๋‹ค. ... 4. ์˜ฌ๋ฆผํ”ฝ๋Œ€ํšŒ์—์„œ 3์œ„ ์ด์ƒ์œผ๋กœ ์ž…์ƒํ•œ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ(๋‹จ์ฒด๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ์ข…๋ชฉ์˜ ๊ฒฝ์šฐ์—๋Š” ์‹ค์ œ๋กœ ์ถœ์ „ํ•œ ์„ ์ˆ˜๋งŒ ํ•ด๋‹นํ•œ๋‹ค) 5. ์•„์‹œ์•„๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ๋Œ€ํšŒ์—์„œ 1์œ„๋กœ ์ž…์ƒํ•œ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ(๋‹จ์ฒด๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ์ข…๋ชฉ์˜ ๊ฒฝ์šฐ์—๋Š” ์‹ค์ œ๋กœ ์ถœ์ „ํ•œ ์„ ์ˆ˜๋งŒ ํ•ด๋‹นํ•œ๋‹ค). [In Article 33, Paragraph 7, Subparagraph 2 of the Act, 'a person having special talents in arts and athletics fields, as defined by presidential order' refers to persons to whom are applicable any one of the provisions of the following subparagraphs. ... 4. A person who received a prize for ranked third or above at the Olympics (in the case of team events, only applicable to athletes who actually participated). 5. A person who received a prize for ranking first at the Asian Games (in the case of team events, only applicable to athletes who actually participated).]

^ "๋ฆฌ์šฐ์—์„œ๋„ ๋– ์˜ค๋ฅธ ์ถ•๊ตฌ๋Œ€ํ‘œํŒ€ '๋ณ‘์—ญํŠน๋ก€'".

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^ "๋“ค์ญ‰๋‚ ์ญ‰ ๋ณ‘์—ญํŠน๋ก€๊ธฐ์ค€ 'ํ˜•ํ‰์„ฑ' ๋…ผ๋ž€๏ฟฝ๋ณ‘๋ฌด์ฒญ '๋ˆ„์ ์ ์ˆ˜์ œ' ์ถ”์ง„" (in Korean). Yonhap News Agency. September 30, 2016.

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^ "Hyeon Chung Participates In Korean Military Training - ATP World Tour - Tennis - ATP World Tour - Tennis".

^ ๊ณต๋ฌด์›๋ณด์ˆ˜๊ทœ์ • '๋ณ„ํ‘œ 13' ๊ตฐ์ธ์˜ ๋ด‰๊ธ‰ํ‘œ(์ œ5์กฐ ๋ฐ ๋ณ„ํ‘œ 1 ๊ด€๋ จ) . Korea Ministry of Government Legislation (in Korean). Retrieved 28 April 2015.

^ ์กฐ, ๊ธฐํ˜ธ (18 July 2012). "์šด๋™ํ™” ํ•œ ์ผค๋ ˆ ๋ชป ์ฃผ๋Š” ๊ตฐ(่ป)!". Seoul Broadcasting System. Retrieved 4 August 2012.

^ "[๋ณด๋„์ž๋ฃŒ] ์˜ˆ์‚ฐ ์—†๋‹ค๋˜ ๊ตญ๋ฐฉ๋ถ€, ์‚ฌ๊ด€์ƒ๋„์—๊ฒŒ๋Š” ๊ณ ๊ฐ€ ์™ธ๊ตญ๋ธŒ๋žœ๋“œ ์šด๋™ํ™” ์ง€๊ธ‰". Retrieved 4 August 2012.[dead link]

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^ (in Korean) "์ตœ์ง€์šฐ, '์Šนํ—Œ์ด์—๊ฒŒ ๋ง ๊ฑธ์–ด๋ณผ๊นŒ?"[permanent dead link] SSTV. 30 June 2009. Retrieved 2011-11-06

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^ Sunwoo, Carla (11 July 2012). "Choi Daniel to replace Kim Moo-yul". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 5 August 2012. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ Lee, Hye-ji (5 October 2012). "Kim Moo-yeol to Enter Army, Cleaning out Exemption Rumors". 10Asia. Retrieved 2012-11-18.

^ Sunwoo, Carla (11 October 2011). "Kim Moo-yul enlists after rumors". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 26 October 2012. Retrieved 18 November 2012.

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^ "The Full Story Behind T.O.P's Drug Scandal, And The Mysterious Trainee Woman". June 2, 2017. Retrieved June 8, 2017.

^ Jun, R. "BIGBANG's T.O.P To Be Dismissed From Duty For Duration of Prosecution". Soompi. Retrieved 8 June 2017.

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^ Park Hyeong-taek (June 29, 2017). "[SCํ˜„์žฅ] ํƒ‘, ๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ 4ํšŒ ํก์—ฐ ์‹œ์ธ๏ฟฝ"๊ณต์†Œ์‚ฌ์‹ค ๋ชจ๋‘ ์ธ์ •"" [[SC scene] Top, smoking four po ... "All the facts of the charges"]. Sports Chosun (in Korean). Retrieved July 19, 2017.

^ Riddhiman Mukhopadhyay (July 20, 2017). "Rapper T.O.P sentenced at final trial: Apologizes to fans for his actions". International Business Times. Retrieved July 21, 2017.

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^ "๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์žฌ๋ณต๋ฌด์‹ฌ์‚ฌ์—์„œ ๋ถ€์ ํ•ฉ ๊ฒฐ๋ก ๏ฟฝ ์˜๊ฒฝ์‹ ๋ถ„ ๋ฐ•ํƒˆ" [Big Bang tower is inadequate in re-examination ... Deprivation of state]. Sports Chosun (in Korean). July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "BIGBANG's T.O.P to lose police post after drug conviction". Yonhap News Agency. July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ ์‹ ๋ถ„ ๋ฐ•ํƒˆ '์žฌ๋ณต๋ฌด ์‹ฌ์‚ฌ์„œ ๋ถ€์ ํ•ฉ ํŒ์ •'" [Top, disqualification of state of rehabilitation]. Starin E-Daily (in Korean). July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "BigBang rapper T.O.P cannot continue serving military duty as a policeman". Starits Times. July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

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^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

Exter

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#37236263)



Reply Favorite

Date: January 28th, 2018 9:33 PM
Author: bateful site

All of your poasts suck and are the same 4 or 5 things you mentally retarded gook.

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35264374)



Reply Favorite

Date: January 28th, 2018 9:36 PM
Author: boyish nubile son of senegal

if you track my posts you will already know what im referring to. im just building up hype so the day of the official announcement is that much more epic

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35264411)



Reply Favorite

Date: November 15th, 2018 1:11 AM
Author: Demanding gold center

Wikipedia Search

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

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^ a b Lee, Namhee (2007). The Making of Minjung: Democracy and the Politics of Representation in South Korea. Cornell University Press. p. 91. ISBN 0801445663.

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^ "Constitution of the Republic of Korea" (PDF). 1987. p. 12. Retrieved 2017-12-27.

^ Kim, Jongcheol (2012). "Constitutional Law". Introduction to Korean Law. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 78. ISBN 3642316891.

^ a b "Military Service Act, Article 8". Korean Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

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^ "Military Service Act, Articles 10-14". Korean Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

^ Lent, Jesse (2016-04-01). "'Descendants Of The Sun' Star Song Joong Ki Discusses His Time In The South Korean Army". Korea Portal. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

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^ "Military Service Act, Articles 26-43". Korea Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "Conscription 'Should Be Phased Out Slowly'". Chosun Ilbo. 2010-07-06. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ Kim, Christine (2010-12-22). "Plan to cut compulsory military service scrapped". Korea JoongAng Daily. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "์ œ68์กฐ์˜11(์˜ˆ์ˆ ใ†์ฒด์œก์š”์›์˜ ์ถ”์ฒœ ๋“ฑ) [Article 68-11: Recommendation of arts and sports personnel, etc.]". ๋ณ‘์—ญ๋ฒ• ์‹œํ–‰๋ น [Military Service Act Implementation Rules]. South Korea: Ministry of Government Legislation. 29 November 2016. Retrieved 6 April 2018. ๋ฒ• ์ œ33์กฐ์˜7์ œ1ํ•ญ ์ „๋‹จ์—์„œ "๋Œ€ํ†ต๋ น๋ น์œผ๋กœ ์ •ํ•˜๋Š” ์˜ˆ์ˆ ·์ฒด์œก ๋ถ„์•ผ์˜ ํŠน๊ธฐ๋ฅผ ๊ฐ€์ง„ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ"์ด๋ž€ ๋‹ค์Œ ๊ฐ ํ˜ธ์˜ ์–ด๋Š ํ•˜๋‚˜์— ํ•ด๋‹นํ•˜๋Š” ์‚ฌ๋žŒ์„ ๋งํ•œ๋‹ค. ... 4. ์˜ฌ๋ฆผํ”ฝ๋Œ€ํšŒ์—์„œ 3์œ„ ์ด์ƒ์œผ๋กœ ์ž…์ƒํ•œ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ(๋‹จ์ฒด๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ์ข…๋ชฉ์˜ ๊ฒฝ์šฐ์—๋Š” ์‹ค์ œ๋กœ ์ถœ์ „ํ•œ ์„ ์ˆ˜๋งŒ ํ•ด๋‹นํ•œ๋‹ค) 5. ์•„์‹œ์•„๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ๋Œ€ํšŒ์—์„œ 1์œ„๋กœ ์ž…์ƒํ•œ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ(๋‹จ์ฒด๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ์ข…๋ชฉ์˜ ๊ฒฝ์šฐ์—๋Š” ์‹ค์ œ๋กœ ์ถœ์ „ํ•œ ์„ ์ˆ˜๋งŒ ํ•ด๋‹นํ•œ๋‹ค). [In Article 33, Paragraph 7, Subparagraph 2 of the Act, 'a person having special talents in arts and athletics fields, as defined by presidential order' refers to persons to whom are applicable any one of the provisions of the following subparagraphs. ... 4. A person who received a prize for ranked third or above at the Olympics (in the case of team events, only applicable to athletes who actually participated). 5. A person who received a prize for ranking first at the Asian Games (in the case of team events, only applicable to athletes who actually participated).]

^ "๋ฆฌ์šฐ์—์„œ๋„ ๋– ์˜ค๋ฅธ ์ถ•๊ตฌ๋Œ€ํ‘œํŒ€ '๋ณ‘์—ญํŠน๋ก€'".

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^ "๋“ค์ญ‰๋‚ ์ญ‰ ๋ณ‘์—ญํŠน๋ก€๊ธฐ์ค€ 'ํ˜•ํ‰์„ฑ' ๋…ผ๋ž€๏ฟฝ๋ณ‘๋ฌด์ฒญ '๋ˆ„์ ์ ์ˆ˜์ œ' ์ถ”์ง„" (in Korean). Yonhap News Agency. September 30, 2016.

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^ ๊ณต๋ฌด์›๋ณด์ˆ˜๊ทœ์ • '๋ณ„ํ‘œ 13' ๊ตฐ์ธ์˜ ๋ด‰๊ธ‰ํ‘œ(์ œ5์กฐ ๋ฐ ๋ณ„ํ‘œ 1 ๊ด€๋ จ) . Korea Ministry of Government Legislation (in Korean). Retrieved 28 April 2015.

^ ์กฐ, ๊ธฐํ˜ธ (18 July 2012). "์šด๋™ํ™” ํ•œ ์ผค๋ ˆ ๋ชป ์ฃผ๋Š” ๊ตฐ(่ป)!". Seoul Broadcasting System. Retrieved 4 August 2012.

^ "[๋ณด๋„์ž๋ฃŒ] ์˜ˆ์‚ฐ ์—†๋‹ค๋˜ ๊ตญ๋ฐฉ๋ถ€, ์‚ฌ๊ด€์ƒ๋„์—๊ฒŒ๋Š” ๊ณ ๊ฐ€ ์™ธ๊ตญ๋ธŒ๋žœ๋“œ ์šด๋™ํ™” ์ง€๊ธ‰". Retrieved 4 August 2012.[dead link]

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^ (in Korean) "์ตœ์ง€์šฐ, '์Šนํ—Œ์ด์—๊ฒŒ ๋ง ๊ฑธ์–ด๋ณผ๊นŒ?"[permanent dead link] SSTV. 30 June 2009. Retrieved 2011-11-06

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^ Lee, Hye-ji (5 October 2012). "Kim Moo-yeol to Enter Army, Cleaning out Exemption Rumors". 10Asia. Retrieved 2012-11-18.

^ Sunwoo, Carla (11 October 2011). "Kim Moo-yul enlists after rumors". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 26 October 2012. Retrieved 18 November 2012.

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^ "The Full Story Behind T.O.P's Drug Scandal, And The Mysterious Trainee Woman". June 2, 2017. Retrieved June 8, 2017.

^ Jun, R. "BIGBANG's T.O.P To Be Dismissed From Duty For Duration of Prosecution". Soompi. Retrieved 8 June 2017.

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^ Park Hyeong-taek (June 29, 2017). "[SCํ˜„์žฅ] ํƒ‘, ๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ 4ํšŒ ํก์—ฐ ์‹œ์ธ๏ฟฝ"๊ณต์†Œ์‚ฌ์‹ค ๋ชจ๋‘ ์ธ์ •"" [[SC scene] Top, smoking four po ... "All the facts of the charges"]. Sports Chosun (in Korean). Retrieved July 19, 2017.

^ Riddhiman Mukhopadhyay (July 20, 2017). "Rapper T.O.P sentenced at final trial: Apologizes to fans for his actions". International Business Times. Retrieved July 21, 2017.

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^ "๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์žฌ๋ณต๋ฌด์‹ฌ์‚ฌ์—์„œ ๋ถ€์ ํ•ฉ ๊ฒฐ๋ก ๏ฟฝ ์˜๊ฒฝ์‹ ๋ถ„ ๋ฐ•ํƒˆ" [Big Bang tower is inadequate in re-examination ... Deprivation of state]. Sports Chosun (in Korean). July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "BIGBANG's T.O.P to lose police post after drug conviction". Yonhap News Agency. July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ ์‹ ๋ถ„ ๋ฐ•ํƒˆ '์žฌ๋ณต๋ฌด ์‹ฌ์‚ฌ์„œ ๋ถ€์ ํ•ฉ ํŒ์ •'" [Top, disqualification of state of rehabilitation]. Starin E-Daily (in Korean). July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "BigBang rapper T.O.P cannot continue serving military duty as a policeman". Starits Times. July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

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^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

Exter

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#37236270)



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(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35264727)



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(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35326493)



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(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35264723)



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(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35326481)



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Date: February 6th, 2018 12:35 AM
Author: boyish nubile son of senegal



(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35335675)



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Date: November 15th, 2018 1:12 AM
Author: Demanding gold center

Wikipedia Search

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

^ "๋ณ‘์—ญ์ดํ–‰์•ˆ๋‚ด - ๊ฐœ์š”(์ด๊ด„)" [Military Service Implementation Guide - General Overview]. Military Manpower Organization (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-12-28.

^ a b Lee, Namhee (2007). The Making of Minjung: Democracy and the Politics of Representation in South Korea. Cornell University Press. p. 91. ISBN 0801445663.

^ "S. Korea to expand women's role in military". Yonhap News Agency. 2017-12-20. Retrieved 2017-12-28.

^ "Constitution of the Republic of Korea" (PDF). 1987. p. 12. Retrieved 2017-12-27.

^ Kim, Jongcheol (2012). "Constitutional Law". Introduction to Korean Law. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 78. ISBN 3642316891.

^ a b "Military Service Act, Article 8". Korean Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

^ "History". Military Manpower Administration. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

^ "Military Service Act, Article 5". Korean Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

^ "Military Service Act, Articles 10-14". Korean Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

^ Lent, Jesse (2016-04-01). "'Descendants Of The Sun' Star Song Joong Ki Discusses His Time In The South Korean Army". Korea Portal. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "Military Service Act, Article 18". Korea Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "Military Service Act, Articles 26-43". Korea Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "Conscription 'Should Be Phased Out Slowly'". Chosun Ilbo. 2010-07-06. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ Kim, Christine (2010-12-22). "Plan to cut compulsory military service scrapped". Korea JoongAng Daily. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "์ œ68์กฐ์˜11(์˜ˆ์ˆ ใ†์ฒด์œก์š”์›์˜ ์ถ”์ฒœ ๋“ฑ) [Article 68-11: Recommendation of arts and sports personnel, etc.]". ๋ณ‘์—ญ๋ฒ• ์‹œํ–‰๋ น [Military Service Act Implementation Rules]. South Korea: Ministry of Government Legislation. 29 November 2016. Retrieved 6 April 2018. ๋ฒ• ์ œ33์กฐ์˜7์ œ1ํ•ญ ์ „๋‹จ์—์„œ "๋Œ€ํ†ต๋ น๋ น์œผ๋กœ ์ •ํ•˜๋Š” ์˜ˆ์ˆ ·์ฒด์œก ๋ถ„์•ผ์˜ ํŠน๊ธฐ๋ฅผ ๊ฐ€์ง„ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ"์ด๋ž€ ๋‹ค์Œ ๊ฐ ํ˜ธ์˜ ์–ด๋Š ํ•˜๋‚˜์— ํ•ด๋‹นํ•˜๋Š” ์‚ฌ๋žŒ์„ ๋งํ•œ๋‹ค. ... 4. ์˜ฌ๋ฆผํ”ฝ๋Œ€ํšŒ์—์„œ 3์œ„ ์ด์ƒ์œผ๋กœ ์ž…์ƒํ•œ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ(๋‹จ์ฒด๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ์ข…๋ชฉ์˜ ๊ฒฝ์šฐ์—๋Š” ์‹ค์ œ๋กœ ์ถœ์ „ํ•œ ์„ ์ˆ˜๋งŒ ํ•ด๋‹นํ•œ๋‹ค) 5. ์•„์‹œ์•„๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ๋Œ€ํšŒ์—์„œ 1์œ„๋กœ ์ž…์ƒํ•œ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ(๋‹จ์ฒด๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ์ข…๋ชฉ์˜ ๊ฒฝ์šฐ์—๋Š” ์‹ค์ œ๋กœ ์ถœ์ „ํ•œ ์„ ์ˆ˜๋งŒ ํ•ด๋‹นํ•œ๋‹ค). [In Article 33, Paragraph 7, Subparagraph 2 of the Act, 'a person having special talents in arts and athletics fields, as defined by presidential order' refers to persons to whom are applicable any one of the provisions of the following subparagraphs. ... 4. A person who received a prize for ranked third or above at the Olympics (in the case of team events, only applicable to athletes who actually participated). 5. A person who received a prize for ranking first at the Asian Games (in the case of team events, only applicable to athletes who actually participated).]

^ "๋ฆฌ์šฐ์—์„œ๋„ ๋– ์˜ค๋ฅธ ์ถ•๊ตฌ๋Œ€ํ‘œํŒ€ '๋ณ‘์—ญํŠน๋ก€'".

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^ "Medal instead of military service". The Hankyoreh. 11 August 2012. Retrieved 25 February 2013.

^ "๋“ค์ญ‰๋‚ ์ญ‰ ๋ณ‘์—ญํŠน๋ก€๊ธฐ์ค€ 'ํ˜•ํ‰์„ฑ' ๋…ผ๋ž€๏ฟฝ๋ณ‘๋ฌด์ฒญ '๋ˆ„์ ์ ์ˆ˜์ œ' ์ถ”์ง„" (in Korean). Yonhap News Agency. September 30, 2016.

^ "Park Tae-hwan Enters Army Boot Camp". Chosun Ilbo. 5 October 2012. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ "Star Swimmer Says Army Boot Camp Helped Him Grow". Chosun Ilbo. 1 November 2012. Retrieved 4 April 2013.

^ "Hyeon Chung Participates In Korean Military Training - ATP World Tour - Tennis - ATP World Tour - Tennis".

^ ๊ณต๋ฌด์›๋ณด์ˆ˜๊ทœ์ • '๋ณ„ํ‘œ 13' ๊ตฐ์ธ์˜ ๋ด‰๊ธ‰ํ‘œ(์ œ5์กฐ ๋ฐ ๋ณ„ํ‘œ 1 ๊ด€๋ จ) . Korea Ministry of Government Legislation (in Korean). Retrieved 28 April 2015.

^ ์กฐ, ๊ธฐํ˜ธ (18 July 2012). "์šด๋™ํ™” ํ•œ ์ผค๋ ˆ ๋ชป ์ฃผ๋Š” ๊ตฐ(่ป)!". Seoul Broadcasting System. Retrieved 4 August 2012.

^ "[๋ณด๋„์ž๋ฃŒ] ์˜ˆ์‚ฐ ์—†๋‹ค๋˜ ๊ตญ๋ฐฉ๋ถ€, ์‚ฌ๊ด€์ƒ๋„์—๊ฒŒ๋Š” ๊ณ ๊ฐ€ ์™ธ๊ตญ๋ธŒ๋žœ๋“œ ์šด๋™ํ™” ์ง€๊ธ‰". Retrieved 4 August 2012.[dead link]

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^ Seo, Ji-eun "Steve Yoo isn๏ฟฝt coming back to Korea" Archived 6 January 2013 at the Wayback Machine. Joongang Daily. 20 October 2011. retrieved 2011-11-08

^ (in Korean) "์ตœ์ง€์šฐ, '์Šนํ—Œ์ด์—๊ฒŒ ๋ง ๊ฑธ์–ด๋ณผ๊นŒ?"[permanent dead link] SSTV. 30 June 2009. Retrieved 2011-11-06

^ "Song Seung-heon, Jang Hyeok Discharged from Military" HanCinema. 16 November 2011. Retrieved 2011-10-14

^ (in Korean) "Song Seung-heon discharged from the army"Yahoo News Korea, 2006-11-18. Archived 14 June 2011 at the Wayback Machine.

^ "Rapper Gets Suspended Jail Term for Draft Dodging" Chosun Ilbo. 12 April 2011. Retrieved 2011-10-14

^ "KBS, MBC release list of 36 banned entertainers" Dong-A Ilbo. 28 September 2011. 2011-10-14

^ Sunwoo, Carla (22 June 2012). "Actor Kim Moo-yul was poor enough to dodge military service". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 27 January 2013. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ Lee, In-kyung (21 June 2012). "Kim Moo Yul Involved in Military Scandal after Avoiding Duties". enewsWorld. Retrieved 2012-10-06.

^ "High-Paid Actor Exempted from Draft for Poverty". The Chosun Ilbo. 22 June 2012. Retrieved 2012-10-06.

^ Moon, Gwang-lip (25 June 2012). "Agent says Kim Moo-yul's family situation was 'nearly impossible'". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 11 August 2012. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ Sunwoo, Carla (10 July 2012). "Kim Moo-yul kicked off movie set". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 26 January 2013. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ Sunwoo, Carla (11 July 2012). "Choi Daniel to replace Kim Moo-yul". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 5 August 2012. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ Lee, Hye-ji (5 October 2012). "Kim Moo-yeol to Enter Army, Cleaning out Exemption Rumors". 10Asia. Retrieved 2012-11-18.

^ Sunwoo, Carla (11 October 2011). "Kim Moo-yul enlists after rumors". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 26 October 2012. Retrieved 18 November 2012.

^ "BIGBANG's T.O.P confirms military enlistment date". Yibada. November 22, 2016.

^ "The Full Story Behind T.O.P's Drug Scandal, And The Mysterious Trainee Woman". June 2, 2017. Retrieved June 8, 2017.

^ Jun, R. "BIGBANG's T.O.P To Be Dismissed From Duty For Duration of Prosecution". Soompi. Retrieved 8 June 2017.

^ "Medical expert comments on T.O.P's benzodiazepine overdose | allkpop.com". allkpop. Retrieved 2017-06-09.

^ "BIGBANG's T.O.P hospitalized for drug overdose". YonhapNews. June 6, 2017. Retrieved June 6, 2017.

^ "K-pop superstar T.O.P. in intensive care after overdose". BBC. June 8, 2017. Retrieved June 28, 2017.

^ Kim Jung-kyoon (June 30, 2017). "T.O.P admits to all charges at first hearing". Korea JoongAng Daily. Retrieved July 19, 2017.

^ "Big Bang's T.O.P pleads guilty to pot charges". The Jakarta Post. June 30, 2017. Retrieved 2017-07-19.

^ Park Hyeong-taek (June 29, 2017). "[SCํ˜„์žฅ] ํƒ‘, ๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ 4ํšŒ ํก์—ฐ ์‹œ์ธ๏ฟฝ"๊ณต์†Œ์‚ฌ์‹ค ๋ชจ๋‘ ์ธ์ •"" [[SC scene] Top, smoking four po ... "All the facts of the charges"]. Sports Chosun (in Korean). Retrieved July 19, 2017.

^ Riddhiman Mukhopadhyay (July 20, 2017). "Rapper T.O.P sentenced at final trial: Apologizes to fans for his actions". International Business Times. Retrieved July 21, 2017.

^ "(LEAD) BIGBANG's T.O.P. gets suspended sentence for marijuana use". Yonhap News Agency. July 20, 2017. Retrieved July 20, 2017.

^ "๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์žฌ๋ณต๋ฌด์‹ฌ์‚ฌ์—์„œ ๋ถ€์ ํ•ฉ ๊ฒฐ๋ก ๏ฟฝ ์˜๊ฒฝ์‹ ๋ถ„ ๋ฐ•ํƒˆ" [Big Bang tower is inadequate in re-examination ... Deprivation of state]. Sports Chosun (in Korean). July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "BIGBANG's T.O.P to lose police post after drug conviction". Yonhap News Agency. July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ ์‹ ๋ถ„ ๋ฐ•ํƒˆ '์žฌ๋ณต๋ฌด ์‹ฌ์‚ฌ์„œ ๋ถ€์ ํ•ฉ ํŒ์ •'" [Top, disqualification of state of rehabilitation]. Starin E-Daily (in Korean). July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "BigBang rapper T.O.P cannot continue serving military duty as a policeman". Starits Times. July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

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^ "BigBang rapper T.O.P cannot continue serving military duty as a policeman". Starits Times. July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

Exter

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Date: November 15th, 2018 1:11 AM
Author: Demanding gold center

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

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^ "๋ฆฌ์šฐ์—์„œ๋„ ๋– ์˜ค๋ฅธ ์ถ•๊ตฌ๋Œ€ํ‘œํŒ€ '๋ณ‘์—ญํŠน๋ก€'".

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^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

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^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

Exter

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#37236271)



Reply Favorite

Date: February 5th, 2018 12:54 AM
Author: Soggy Box Office

I'm going to lather your faggot waifu pillow with pot-ash and fuck holes into it until the stuffing suffocates your little penguin lungs

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35326494)



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Date: February 5th, 2018 1:12 AM
Author: internet-worthy flirting knife laser beams



(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35326603)



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Date: February 15th, 2018 4:23 AM
Author: boyish nubile son of senegal
Subject: Updated Post Above

http://www.xoxohth.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&mc=28&forum_id=2#35264342

Will bump this thread periodically for the duration of my Norway trip.

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35407603)



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Date: November 15th, 2018 1:12 AM
Author: Demanding gold center

Wikipedia Search

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

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^ a b Lee, Namhee (2007). The Making of Minjung: Democracy and the Politics of Representation in South Korea. Cornell University Press. p. 91. ISBN 0801445663.

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^ "Constitution of the Republic of Korea" (PDF). 1987. p. 12. Retrieved 2017-12-27.

^ Kim, Jongcheol (2012). "Constitutional Law". Introduction to Korean Law. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 78. ISBN 3642316891.

^ a b "Military Service Act, Article 8". Korean Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

^ "History". Military Manpower Administration. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

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^ "Conscription 'Should Be Phased Out Slowly'". Chosun Ilbo. 2010-07-06. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ Kim, Christine (2010-12-22). "Plan to cut compulsory military service scrapped". Korea JoongAng Daily. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "์ œ68์กฐ์˜11(์˜ˆ์ˆ ใ†์ฒด์œก์š”์›์˜ ์ถ”์ฒœ ๋“ฑ) [Article 68-11: Recommendation of arts and sports personnel, etc.]". ๋ณ‘์—ญ๋ฒ• ์‹œํ–‰๋ น [Military Service Act Implementation Rules]. South Korea: Ministry of Government Legislation. 29 November 2016. Retrieved 6 April 2018. ๋ฒ• ์ œ33์กฐ์˜7์ œ1ํ•ญ ์ „๋‹จ์—์„œ "๋Œ€ํ†ต๋ น๋ น์œผ๋กœ ์ •ํ•˜๋Š” ์˜ˆ์ˆ ·์ฒด์œก ๋ถ„์•ผ์˜ ํŠน๊ธฐ๋ฅผ ๊ฐ€์ง„ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ"์ด๋ž€ ๋‹ค์Œ ๊ฐ ํ˜ธ์˜ ์–ด๋Š ํ•˜๋‚˜์— ํ•ด๋‹นํ•˜๋Š” ์‚ฌ๋žŒ์„ ๋งํ•œ๋‹ค. ... 4. ์˜ฌ๋ฆผํ”ฝ๋Œ€ํšŒ์—์„œ 3์œ„ ์ด์ƒ์œผ๋กœ ์ž…์ƒํ•œ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ(๋‹จ์ฒด๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ์ข…๋ชฉ์˜ ๊ฒฝ์šฐ์—๋Š” ์‹ค์ œ๋กœ ์ถœ์ „ํ•œ ์„ ์ˆ˜๋งŒ ํ•ด๋‹นํ•œ๋‹ค) 5. ์•„์‹œ์•„๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ๋Œ€ํšŒ์—์„œ 1์œ„๋กœ ์ž…์ƒํ•œ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ(๋‹จ์ฒด๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ์ข…๋ชฉ์˜ ๊ฒฝ์šฐ์—๋Š” ์‹ค์ œ๋กœ ์ถœ์ „ํ•œ ์„ ์ˆ˜๋งŒ ํ•ด๋‹นํ•œ๋‹ค). [In Article 33, Paragraph 7, Subparagraph 2 of the Act, 'a person having special talents in arts and athletics fields, as defined by presidential order' refers to persons to whom are applicable any one of the provisions of the following subparagraphs. ... 4. A person who received a prize for ranked third or above at the Olympics (in the case of team events, only applicable to athletes who actually participated). 5. A person who received a prize for ranking first at the Asian Games (in the case of team events, only applicable to athletes who actually participated).]

^ "๋ฆฌ์šฐ์—์„œ๋„ ๋– ์˜ค๋ฅธ ์ถ•๊ตฌ๋Œ€ํ‘œํŒ€ '๋ณ‘์—ญํŠน๋ก€'".

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^ ๊ณต๋ฌด์›๋ณด์ˆ˜๊ทœ์ • '๋ณ„ํ‘œ 13' ๊ตฐ์ธ์˜ ๋ด‰๊ธ‰ํ‘œ(์ œ5์กฐ ๋ฐ ๋ณ„ํ‘œ 1 ๊ด€๋ จ) . Korea Ministry of Government Legislation (in Korean). Retrieved 28 April 2015.

^ ์กฐ, ๊ธฐํ˜ธ (18 July 2012). "์šด๋™ํ™” ํ•œ ์ผค๋ ˆ ๋ชป ์ฃผ๋Š” ๊ตฐ(่ป)!". Seoul Broadcasting System. Retrieved 4 August 2012.

^ "[๋ณด๋„์ž๋ฃŒ] ์˜ˆ์‚ฐ ์—†๋‹ค๋˜ ๊ตญ๋ฐฉ๋ถ€, ์‚ฌ๊ด€์ƒ๋„์—๊ฒŒ๋Š” ๊ณ ๊ฐ€ ์™ธ๊ตญ๋ธŒ๋žœ๋“œ ์šด๋™ํ™” ์ง€๊ธ‰". Retrieved 4 August 2012.[dead link]

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^ (in Korean) "์ตœ์ง€์šฐ, '์Šนํ—Œ์ด์—๊ฒŒ ๋ง ๊ฑธ์–ด๋ณผ๊นŒ?"[permanent dead link] SSTV. 30 June 2009. Retrieved 2011-11-06

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^ "High-Paid Actor Exempted from Draft for Poverty". The Chosun Ilbo. 22 June 2012. Retrieved 2012-10-06.

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^ Sunwoo, Carla (11 October 2011). "Kim Moo-yul enlists after rumors". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 26 October 2012. Retrieved 18 November 2012.

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^ Jun, R. "BIGBANG's T.O.P To Be Dismissed From Duty For Duration of Prosecution". Soompi. Retrieved 8 June 2017.

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^ "Big Bang's T.O.P pleads guilty to pot charges". The Jakarta Post. June 30, 2017. Retrieved 2017-07-19.

^ Park Hyeong-taek (June 29, 2017). "[SCํ˜„์žฅ] ํƒ‘, ๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ 4ํšŒ ํก์—ฐ ์‹œ์ธ๏ฟฝ"๊ณต์†Œ์‚ฌ์‹ค ๋ชจ๋‘ ์ธ์ •"" [[SC scene] Top, smoking four po ... "All the facts of the charges"]. Sports Chosun (in Korean). Retrieved July 19, 2017.

^ Riddhiman Mukhopadhyay (July 20, 2017). "Rapper T.O.P sentenced at final trial: Apologizes to fans for his actions". International Business Times. Retrieved July 21, 2017.

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^ "๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์žฌ๋ณต๋ฌด์‹ฌ์‚ฌ์—์„œ ๋ถ€์ ํ•ฉ ๊ฒฐ๋ก ๏ฟฝ ์˜๊ฒฝ์‹ ๋ถ„ ๋ฐ•ํƒˆ" [Big Bang tower is inadequate in re-examination ... Deprivation of state]. Sports Chosun (in Korean). July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "BIGBANG's T.O.P to lose police post after drug conviction". Yonhap News Agency. July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ ์‹ ๋ถ„ ๋ฐ•ํƒˆ '์žฌ๋ณต๋ฌด ์‹ฌ์‚ฌ์„œ ๋ถ€์ ํ•ฉ ํŒ์ •'" [Top, disqualification of state of rehabilitation]. Starin E-Daily (in Korean). July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "BigBang rapper T.O.P cannot continue serving military duty as a policeman". Starits Times. July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

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^ "BigBang rapper T.O.P cannot continue serving military duty as a policeman". Starits Times. July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

Exter

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Date: November 15th, 2018 1:12 AM
Author: Demanding gold center

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

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^ "๋ฆฌ์šฐ์—์„œ๋„ ๋– ์˜ค๋ฅธ ์ถ•๊ตฌ๋Œ€ํ‘œํŒ€ '๋ณ‘์—ญํŠน๋ก€'".

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^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

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^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

Exter

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#37236276)



Reply Favorite

Date: February 15th, 2018 4:37 AM
Author: boyish nubile son of senegal

This thread is dedicated to Tommy Turdskin - may you find peace drinking juice on the shores of Pattaya - SAD, and all my other minority bros who want to make love to a beautiful Norwegian girl.

I'm here to tell you WGWAG is real. Make your own destiny.

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35407610)



Reply Favorite

Date: February 15th, 2018 4:45 AM
Author: 180 Property

The fact that you value white pussy so much reveals deep seated self-loathing. It’s really sad.

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35407615)



Reply Favorite

Date: February 15th, 2018 5:07 AM
Author: ungodly dysfunction garrison



(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35407620)



Reply Favorite

Date: February 15th, 2018 5:29 AM
Author: boyish nubile son of senegal

Rather this statement from you merely reveals your own insecurities.

Take a step back and think about WGWAG vs AGWWG in the abstract.

Consider the dynamics of both. How does history affect the two? Similarly, how does the current social structure affect them? You don't really understand this and that's why you are reacting the way you are.

Now, this is, of course, aside from the pleasure principle itself, which I think you will agree is reason enough for a man to travel to Norway to meet beautiful Norwegian women - but surprisingly an unsatisfactory reason in your eyes - there are some very good reasons to visit Norway.

Which group has had the upper hand in dating, historically speaking? White men or Asian men?

Now consider: which group, on the global scale, controls social structures which affect dating regardless of the country?

Therein lies the difference between WGWAG and AGWWG. One of the reasons why the former is respected and the latter not is its inherent nobility. It is intrinsically just in the sense that the Yellow Man triumphs over all the challenges beset to him by the larger society he is a part of and the history that led to present societal conditions. In this sense, it is an ultimate affirmation of one's self-value.

AGWWG is akin to the Lion when he seeks out weak and diseased prey. There is no challenge. There is no overcoming difficulty. There is no affirmation of one's Manhood and Self.

One great thing about XOXO is that it forces you to evaluate who you are. And your values. Any reasonable Man doesn't ignore criticism. He evaluates them and makes the best decision based on said introspection.

When my critics claim that meeting white women in Korea is not noteworthy, they have a point. After all, is a White Man in America who dates Asian Women notable in any significant way? Of course not.

Interesting note: last night when I met my Norwegian goddess at the hotel bar, the entire crowd was white. Literally not a single minority. Except one.

An Asian woman - looked to be Vietnamese - who was with a Norwegian man.

But seated right next to them were a Korean Alpha with his blonde Norwegian goddess. I had conquered the entire Hotel Bar the second my goddess put her hands on me. That's true empowerment.

So the decision was simple. What was there left for me, as a Korean male who has already made love to hundreds of beautiful white women in multiple countries - USA & Japan & Korea?

The ultimate affirmation of my manhood, thus, would be going to the heart of Scandinavia itself and successfully planting my seed in as many beautiful Scandinavian women as I can.

The Asian woman in the White Man lands is self-hating and self-loathing. She disgraces her own race by submitting herself to her conquerors. She doesn't love herself and that is why she cannot even love her own race, which gave her the color of her own skin, eyes, and hair.

A true Korean alpha like myself understands that women of all races are to be conquered. And the most difficult of these is to travel to the lands that gave birth to the challenges that beset the Yellow Man in the present day - Scandinavia.

This is where White began. But now it flies the Yellow banner.

These are accomplishments to be respected but you simply cannot because you know that it completely degrades your own manhood seeing a Korean man achieve the impossible.

Deal with it, friend.

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35407634)



Reply Favorite

Date: February 15th, 2018 9:12 AM
Author: 180 Property

Tl:dr

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35408035)



Reply Favorite

Date: February 15th, 2018 9:32 AM
Author: boyish nubile son of senegal

All you need to know, cumskin dork, is that I will be balls deep in a 19 year old Norwegian hottie who is a legit 9 and I will try to creampie this girl as well.

Bitch.

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35408142)



Reply Favorite

Date: February 15th, 2018 9:35 AM
Author: racy place of business

(NOWAG that won’t close or even meet up with the 4 he’s been txt’ing)

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35408153)



Reply Favorite

Date: February 15th, 2018 9:41 AM
Author: boyish nubile son of senegal

Already creampied 2 Norwegian girls, friend. About to creampie my third.

Not bad for a Korean dewd traveling solo. Love Norway.

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35408182)



Reply Favorite

Date: February 15th, 2018 9:44 AM
Author: racy place of business

(NOWAG that hasn’t even spoken to a girl)

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35408188)



Reply Favorite

Date: February 15th, 2018 9:46 AM
Author: boyish nubile son of senegal

RSF, I really love how you literally cannot even process the cold nigga truth of hot Korean sperm in fertile Norwegian cunnus.

I mean, your Jew ass couldnt even do what I do because lets face it: Big Korean Cock is what Norwegian cuties want.

That's right. Youre my bitch

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35408195)



Reply Favorite

Date: February 15th, 2018 9:47 AM
Author: racy place of business

Literally no one in the world would ever believe your clearly imaginary stories NOWAG. We get that 30 years of NOWAG and having to self-deport broke you mentally

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35408200)



Reply Favorite

Date: February 15th, 2018 9:50 AM
Author: boyish nubile son of senegal

Dont worry RSF I will post the proof pics in one post at the end of my trip.

Seriously LOLing at how furious you are right now because you never wouldve imagined in a thousand years that Gangnam WGWAG Playboy would be fucking more Norwegian babes than you.

Absolutely DEVSTATING, you little beta Jew bitch. ;)

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35408214)



Reply Favorite

Date: February 15th, 2018 9:52 AM
Author: racy place of business

(“Guy” who didn’t even speak to a single girl)

No one belives you, LOL @ your broken NOWAG brain you fat lesbian.

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35408225)



Reply Favorite

Date: February 15th, 2018 9:54 AM
Author: boyish nubile son of senegal

Oh btw I came here on my KOREAN PASSPORT.

Devastating. Jesus christ RSF there never has been a gaping of this magnitude of a cumskin dork by Big Korean Cock in the history of the board.

Devastating.

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35408238)



Reply Favorite

Date: February 15th, 2018 9:55 AM
Author: racy place of business

What unit did you serve in?

(http://www.autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=3874347&forum_id=2#35408243)



Reply Favorite

Date: November 15th, 2018 1:13 AM
Author: Demanding gold center

Wikipedia Search

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

^ "๋ณ‘์—ญ์ดํ–‰์•ˆ๋‚ด - ๊ฐœ์š”(์ด๊ด„)" [Military Service Implementation Guide - General Overview]. Military Manpower Organization (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-12-28.

^ a b Lee, Namhee (2007). The Making of Minjung: Democracy and the Politics of Representation in South Korea. Cornell University Press. p. 91. ISBN 0801445663.

^ "S. Korea to expand women's role in military". Yonhap News Agency. 2017-12-20. Retrieved 2017-12-28.

^ "Constitution of the Republic of Korea" (PDF). 1987. p. 12. Retrieved 2017-12-27.

^ Kim, Jongcheol (2012). "Constitutional Law". Introduction to Korean Law. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 78. ISBN 3642316891.

^ a b "Military Service Act, Article 8". Korean Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

^ "History". Military Manpower Administration. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

^ "Military Service Act, Article 5". Korean Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

^ "Military Service Act, Articles 10-14". Korean Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

^ Lent, Jesse (2016-04-01). "'Descendants Of The Sun' Star Song Joong Ki Discusses His Time In The South Korean Army". Korea Portal. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "Military Service Act, Article 18". Korea Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "Military Service Act, Articles 26-43". Korea Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "Conscription 'Should Be Phased Out Slowly'". Chosun Ilbo. 2010-07-06. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ Kim, Christine (2010-12-22). "Plan to cut compulsory military service scrapped". Korea JoongAng Daily. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "์ œ68์กฐ์˜11(์˜ˆ์ˆ ใ†์ฒด์œก์š”์›์˜ ์ถ”์ฒœ ๋“ฑ) [Article 68-11: Recommendation of arts and sports personnel, etc.]". ๋ณ‘์—ญ๋ฒ• ์‹œํ–‰๋ น [Military Service Act Implementation Rules]. South Korea: Ministry of Government Legislation. 29 November 2016. Retrieved 6 April 2018. ๋ฒ• ์ œ33์กฐ์˜7์ œ1ํ•ญ ์ „๋‹จ์—์„œ "๋Œ€ํ†ต๋ น๋ น์œผ๋กœ ์ •ํ•˜๋Š” ์˜ˆ์ˆ ·์ฒด์œก ๋ถ„์•ผ์˜ ํŠน๊ธฐ๋ฅผ ๊ฐ€์ง„ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ"์ด๋ž€ ๋‹ค์Œ ๊ฐ ํ˜ธ์˜ ์–ด๋Š ํ•˜๋‚˜์— ํ•ด๋‹นํ•˜๋Š” ์‚ฌ๋žŒ์„ ๋งํ•œ๋‹ค. ... 4. ์˜ฌ๋ฆผํ”ฝ๋Œ€ํšŒ์—์„œ 3์œ„ ์ด์ƒ์œผ๋กœ ์ž…์ƒํ•œ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ(๋‹จ์ฒด๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ์ข…๋ชฉ์˜ ๊ฒฝ์šฐ์—๋Š” ์‹ค์ œ๋กœ ์ถœ์ „ํ•œ ์„ ์ˆ˜๋งŒ ํ•ด๋‹นํ•œ๋‹ค) 5. ์•„์‹œ์•„๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ๋Œ€ํšŒ์—์„œ 1์œ„๋กœ ์ž…์ƒํ•œ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ(๋‹จ์ฒด๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ์ข…๋ชฉ์˜ ๊ฒฝ์šฐ์—๋Š” ์‹ค์ œ๋กœ ์ถœ์ „ํ•œ ์„ ์ˆ˜๋งŒ ํ•ด๋‹นํ•œ๋‹ค). [In Article 33, Paragraph 7, Subparagraph 2 of the Act, 'a person having special talents in arts and athletics fields, as defined by presidential order' refers to persons to whom are applicable any one of the provisions of the following subparagraphs. ... 4. A person who received a prize for ranked third or above at the Olympics (in the case of team events, only applicable to athletes who actually participated). 5. A person who received a prize for ranking first at the Asian Games (in the case of team events, only applicable to athletes who actually participated).]

^ "๋ฆฌ์šฐ์—์„œ๋„ ๋– ์˜ค๋ฅธ ์ถ•๊ตฌ๋Œ€ํ‘œํŒ€ '๋ณ‘์—ญํŠน๋ก€'".

^ "Footballer to Be Spared Military Service Despite IOC Probe". Chosun Ilbo. 14 August 2012. Retrieved 2 October 2012.

^ "Medal instead of military service". The Hankyoreh. 11 August 2012. Retrieved 25 February 2013.

^ "๋“ค์ญ‰๋‚ ์ญ‰ ๋ณ‘์—ญํŠน๋ก€๊ธฐ์ค€ 'ํ˜•ํ‰์„ฑ' ๋…ผ๋ž€๏ฟฝ๋ณ‘๋ฌด์ฒญ '๋ˆ„์ ์ ์ˆ˜์ œ' ์ถ”์ง„" (in Korean). Yonhap News Agency. September 30, 2016.

^ "Park Tae-hwan Enters Army Boot Camp". Chosun Ilbo. 5 October 2012. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ "Star Swimmer Says Army Boot Camp Helped Him Grow". Chosun Ilbo. 1 November 2012. Retrieved 4 April 2013.

^ "Hyeon Chung Participates In Korean Military Training - ATP World Tour - Tennis - ATP World Tour - Tennis".

^ ๊ณต๋ฌด์›๋ณด์ˆ˜๊ทœ์ • '๋ณ„ํ‘œ 13' ๊ตฐ์ธ์˜ ๋ด‰๊ธ‰ํ‘œ(์ œ5์กฐ ๋ฐ ๋ณ„ํ‘œ 1 ๊ด€๋ จ) . Korea Ministry of Government Legislation (in Korean). Retrieved 28 April 2015.

^ ์กฐ, ๊ธฐํ˜ธ (18 July 2012). "์šด๋™ํ™” ํ•œ ์ผค๋ ˆ ๋ชป ์ฃผ๋Š” ๊ตฐ(่ป)!". Seoul Broadcasting System. Retrieved 4 August 2012.

^ "[๋ณด๋„์ž๋ฃŒ] ์˜ˆ์‚ฐ ์—†๋‹ค๋˜ ๊ตญ๋ฐฉ๋ถ€, ์‚ฌ๊ด€์ƒ๋„์—๊ฒŒ๋Š” ๊ณ ๊ฐ€ ์™ธ๊ตญ๋ธŒ๋žœ๋“œ ์šด๋™ํ™” ์ง€๊ธ‰". Retrieved 4 August 2012.[dead link]

^ "FAQs-Dual Citizens | U.S. Embassy & Consulate in Korea". U.S. Embassy & Consulate in Korea. Retrieved 2017-10-12.

^ "South Korean singer Rain reports for military service". BBC News. 11 October 2011. Retrieved 2011-10-14.

^ Park, Eun-jee (16 January 2013). "Military service mischief a losing battle". Joongang Daily. Archived from the original on 29 June 2013. Retrieved 4 April 2013.

^ Seo, Ji-eun "Steve Yoo isn๏ฟฝt coming back to Korea" Archived 6 January 2013 at the Wayback Machine. Joongang Daily. 20 October 2011. retrieved 2011-11-08

^ (in Korean) "์ตœ์ง€์šฐ, '์Šนํ—Œ์ด์—๊ฒŒ ๋ง ๊ฑธ์–ด๋ณผ๊นŒ?"[permanent dead link] SSTV. 30 June 2009. Retrieved 2011-11-06

^ "Song Seung-heon, Jang Hyeok Discharged from Military" HanCinema. 16 November 2011. Retrieved 2011-10-14

^ (in Korean) "Song Seung-heon discharged from the army"Yahoo News Korea, 2006-11-18. Archived 14 June 2011 at the Wayback Machine.

^ "Rapper Gets Suspended Jail Term for Draft Dodging" Chosun Ilbo. 12 April 2011. Retrieved 2011-10-14

^ "KBS, MBC release list of 36 banned entertainers" Dong-A Ilbo. 28 September 2011. 2011-10-14

^ Sunwoo, Carla (22 June 2012). "Actor Kim Moo-yul was poor enough to dodge military service". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 27 January 2013. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ Lee, In-kyung (21 June 2012). "Kim Moo Yul Involved in Military Scandal after Avoiding Duties". enewsWorld. Retrieved 2012-10-06.

^ "High-Paid Actor Exempted from Draft for Poverty". The Chosun Ilbo. 22 June 2012. Retrieved 2012-10-06.

^ Moon, Gwang-lip (25 June 2012). "Agent says Kim Moo-yul's family situation was 'nearly impossible'". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 11 August 2012. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ Sunwoo, Carla (10 July 2012). "Kim Moo-yul kicked off movie set". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 26 January 2013. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ Sunwoo, Carla (11 July 2012). "Choi Daniel to replace Kim Moo-yul". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 5 August 2012. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ Lee, Hye-ji (5 October 2012). "Kim Moo-yeol to Enter Army, Cleaning out Exemption Rumors". 10Asia. Retrieved 2012-11-18.

^ Sunwoo, Carla (11 October 2011). "Kim Moo-yul enlists after rumors". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 26 October 2012. Retrieved 18 November 2012.

^ "BIGBANG's T.O.P confirms military enlistment date". Yibada. November 22, 2016.

^ "The Full Story Behind T.O.P's Drug Scandal, And The Mysterious Trainee Woman". June 2, 2017. Retrieved June 8, 2017.

^ Jun, R. "BIGBANG's T.O.P To Be Dismissed From Duty For Duration of Prosecution". Soompi. Retrieved 8 June 2017.

^ "Medical expert comments on T.O.P's benzodiazepine overdose | allkpop.com". allkpop. Retrieved 2017-06-09.

^ "BIGBANG's T.O.P hospitalized for drug overdose". YonhapNews. June 6, 2017. Retrieved June 6, 2017.

^ "K-pop superstar T.O.P. in intensive care after overdose". BBC. June 8, 2017. Retrieved June 28, 2017.

^ Kim Jung-kyoon (June 30, 2017). "T.O.P admits to all charges at first hearing". Korea JoongAng Daily. Retrieved July 19, 2017.

^ "Big Bang's T.O.P pleads guilty to pot charges". The Jakarta Post. June 30, 2017. Retrieved 2017-07-19.

^ Park Hyeong-taek (June 29, 2017). "[SCํ˜„์žฅ] ํƒ‘, ๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ 4ํšŒ ํก์—ฐ ์‹œ์ธ๏ฟฝ"๊ณต์†Œ์‚ฌ์‹ค ๋ชจ๋‘ ์ธ์ •"" [[SC scene] Top, smoking four po ... "All the facts of the charges"]. Sports Chosun (in Korean). Retrieved July 19, 2017.

^ Riddhiman Mukhopadhyay (July 20, 2017). "Rapper T.O.P sentenced at final trial: Apologizes to fans for his actions". International Business Times. Retrieved July 21, 2017.

^ "(LEAD) BIGBANG's T.O.P. gets suspended sentence for marijuana use". Yonhap News Agency. July 20, 2017. Retrieved July 20, 2017.

^ "๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์žฌ๋ณต๋ฌด์‹ฌ์‚ฌ์—์„œ ๋ถ€์ ํ•ฉ ๊ฒฐ๋ก ๏ฟฝ ์˜๊ฒฝ์‹ ๋ถ„ ๋ฐ•ํƒˆ" [Big Bang tower is inadequate in re-examination ... Deprivation of state]. Sports Chosun (in Korean). July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "BIGBANG's T.O.P to lose police post after drug conviction". Yonhap News Agency. July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ ์‹ ๋ถ„ ๋ฐ•ํƒˆ '์žฌ๋ณต๋ฌด ์‹ฌ์‚ฌ์„œ ๋ถ€์ ํ•ฉ ํŒ์ •'" [Top, disqualification of state of rehabilitation]. Starin E-Daily (in Korean). July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "BigBang rapper T.O.P cannot continue serving military duty as a policeman". Starits Times. July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

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^ a b Lee, Namhee (2007). The Making of Minjung: Democracy and the Politics of Representation in South Korea. Cornell University Press. p. 91. ISBN 0801445663.

^ "S. Korea to expand women's role in military". Yonhap News Agency. 2017-12-20. Retrieved 2017-12-28.

^ "Constitution of the Republic of Korea" (PDF). 1987. p. 12. Retrieved 2017-12-27.

^ Kim, Jongcheol (2012). "Constitutional Law". Introduction to Korean Law. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 78. ISBN 3642316891.

^ a b "Military Service Act, Article 8". Korean Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

^ "History". Military Manpower Administration. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

^ "Military Service Act, Article 5". Korean Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

^ "Military Service Act, Articles 10-14". Korean Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

^ Lent, Jesse (2016-04-01). "'Descendants Of The Sun' Star Song Joong Ki Discusses His Time In The South Korean Army". Korea Portal. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "Military Service Act, Article 18". Korea Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "Military Service Act, Articles 26-43". Korea Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "Conscription 'Should Be Phased Out Slowly'". Chosun Ilbo. 2010-07-06. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ Kim, Christine (2010-12-22). "Plan to cut compulsory military service scrapped". Korea JoongAng Daily. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "์ œ68์กฐ์˜11(์˜ˆ์ˆ ใ†์ฒด์œก์š”์›์˜ ์ถ”์ฒœ ๋“ฑ) [Article 68-11: Recommendation of arts and sports personnel, etc.]". ๋ณ‘์—ญ๋ฒ• ์‹œํ–‰๋ น [Military Service Act Implementation Rules]. South Korea: Ministry of Government Legislation. 29 November 2016. Retrieved 6 April 2018. ๋ฒ• ์ œ33์กฐ์˜7์ œ1ํ•ญ ์ „๋‹จ์—์„œ "๋Œ€ํ†ต๋ น๋ น์œผ๋กœ ์ •ํ•˜๋Š” ์˜ˆ์ˆ ·์ฒด์œก ๋ถ„์•ผ์˜ ํŠน๊ธฐ๋ฅผ ๊ฐ€์ง„ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ"์ด๋ž€ ๋‹ค์Œ ๊ฐ ํ˜ธ์˜ ์–ด๋Š ํ•˜๋‚˜์— ํ•ด๋‹นํ•˜๋Š” ์‚ฌ๋žŒ์„ ๋งํ•œ๋‹ค. ... 4. ์˜ฌ๋ฆผํ”ฝ๋Œ€ํšŒ์—์„œ 3์œ„ ์ด์ƒ์œผ๋กœ ์ž…์ƒํ•œ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ(๋‹จ์ฒด๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ์ข…๋ชฉ์˜ ๊ฒฝ์šฐ์—๋Š” ์‹ค์ œ๋กœ ์ถœ์ „ํ•œ ์„ ์ˆ˜๋งŒ ํ•ด๋‹นํ•œ๋‹ค) 5. ์•„์‹œ์•„๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ๋Œ€ํšŒ์—์„œ 1์œ„๋กœ ์ž…์ƒํ•œ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ(๋‹จ์ฒด๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ์ข…๋ชฉ์˜ ๊ฒฝ์šฐ์—๋Š” ์‹ค์ œ๋กœ ์ถœ์ „ํ•œ ์„ ์ˆ˜๋งŒ ํ•ด๋‹นํ•œ๋‹ค). [In Article 33, Paragraph 7, Subparagraph 2 of the Act, 'a person having special talents in arts and athletics fields, as defined by presidential order' refers to persons to whom are applicable any one of the provisions of the following subparagraphs. ... 4. A person who received a prize for ranked third or above at the Olympics (in the case of team events, only applicable to athletes who actually participated). 5. A person who received a prize for ranking first at the Asian Games (in the case of team events, only applicable to athletes who actually participated).]

^ "๋ฆฌ์šฐ์—์„œ๋„ ๋– ์˜ค๋ฅธ ์ถ•๊ตฌ๋Œ€ํ‘œํŒ€ '๋ณ‘์—ญํŠน๋ก€'".

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^ "Star Swimmer Says Army Boot Camp Helped Him Grow". Chosun Ilbo. 1 November 2012. Retrieved 4 April 2013.

^ "Hyeon Chung Participates In Korean Military Training - ATP World Tour - Tennis - ATP World Tour - Tennis".

^ ๊ณต๋ฌด์›๋ณด์ˆ˜๊ทœ์ • '๋ณ„ํ‘œ 13' ๊ตฐ์ธ์˜ ๋ด‰๊ธ‰ํ‘œ(์ œ5์กฐ ๋ฐ ๋ณ„ํ‘œ 1 ๊ด€๋ จ) . Korea Ministry of Government Legislation (in Korean). Retrieved 28 April 2015.

^ ์กฐ, ๊ธฐํ˜ธ (18 July 2012). "์šด๋™ํ™” ํ•œ ์ผค๋ ˆ ๋ชป ์ฃผ๋Š” ๊ตฐ(่ป)!". Seoul Broadcasting System. Retrieved 4 August 2012.

^ "[๋ณด๋„์ž๋ฃŒ] ์˜ˆ์‚ฐ ์—†๋‹ค๋˜ ๊ตญ๋ฐฉ๋ถ€, ์‚ฌ๊ด€์ƒ๋„์—๊ฒŒ๋Š” ๊ณ ๊ฐ€ ์™ธ๊ตญ๋ธŒ๋žœ๋“œ ์šด๋™ํ™” ์ง€๊ธ‰". Retrieved 4 August 2012.[dead link]

^ "FAQs-Dual Citizens | U.S. Embassy & Consulate in Korea". U.S. Embassy & Consulate in Korea. Retrieved 2017-10-12.

^ "South Korean singer Rain reports for military service". BBC News. 11 October 2011. Retrieved 2011-10-14.

^ Park, Eun-jee (16 January 2013). "Military service mischief a losing battle". Joongang Daily. Archived from the original on 29 June 2013. Retrieved 4 April 2013.

^ Seo, Ji-eun "Steve Yoo isn๏ฟฝt coming back to Korea" Archived 6 January 2013 at the Wayback Machine. Joongang Daily. 20 October 2011. retrieved 2011-11-08

^ (in Korean) "์ตœ์ง€์šฐ, '์Šนํ—Œ์ด์—๊ฒŒ ๋ง ๊ฑธ์–ด๋ณผ๊นŒ?"[permanent dead link] SSTV. 30 June 2009. Retrieved 2011-11-06

^ "Song Seung-heon, Jang Hyeok Discharged from Military" HanCinema. 16 November 2011. Retrieved 2011-10-14

^ (in Korean) "Song Seung-heon discharged from the army"Yahoo News Korea, 2006-11-18. Archived 14 June 2011 at the Wayback Machine.

^ "Rapper Gets Suspended Jail Term for Draft Dodging" Chosun Ilbo. 12 April 2011. Retrieved 2011-10-14

^ "KBS, MBC release list of 36 banned entertainers" Dong-A Ilbo. 28 September 2011. 2011-10-14

^ Sunwoo, Carla (22 June 2012). "Actor Kim Moo-yul was poor enough to dodge military service". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 27 January 2013. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ Lee, In-kyung (21 June 2012). "Kim Moo Yul Involved in Military Scandal after Avoiding Duties". enewsWorld. Retrieved 2012-10-06.

^ "High-Paid Actor Exempted from Draft for Poverty". The Chosun Ilbo. 22 June 2012. Retrieved 2012-10-06.

^ Moon, Gwang-lip (25 June 2012). "Agent says Kim Moo-yul's family situation was 'nearly impossible'". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 11 August 2012. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ Sunwoo, Carla (10 July 2012). "Kim Moo-yul kicked off movie set". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 26 January 2013. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ Sunwoo, Carla (11 July 2012). "Choi Daniel to replace Kim Moo-yul". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 5 August 2012. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ Lee, Hye-ji (5 October 2012). "Kim Moo-yeol to Enter Army, Cleaning out Exemption Rumors". 10Asia. Retrieved 2012-11-18.

^ Sunwoo, Carla (11 October 2011). "Kim Moo-yul enlists after rumors". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 26 October 2012. Retrieved 18 November 2012.

^ "BIGBANG's T.O.P confirms military enlistment date". Yibada. November 22, 2016.

^ "The Full Story Behind T.O.P's Drug Scandal, And The Mysterious Trainee Woman". June 2, 2017. Retrieved June 8, 2017.

^ Jun, R. "BIGBANG's T.O.P To Be Dismissed From Duty For Duration of Prosecution". Soompi. Retrieved 8 June 2017.

^ "Medical expert comments on T.O.P's benzodiazepine overdose | allkpop.com". allkpop. Retrieved 2017-06-09.

^ "BIGBANG's T.O.P hospitalized for drug overdose". YonhapNews. June 6, 2017. Retrieved June 6, 2017.

^ "K-pop superstar T.O.P. in intensive care after overdose". BBC. June 8, 2017. Retrieved June 28, 2017.

^ Kim Jung-kyoon (June 30, 2017). "T.O.P admits to all charges at first hearing". Korea JoongAng Daily. Retrieved July 19, 2017.

^ "Big Bang's T.O.P pleads guilty to pot charges". The Jakarta Post. June 30, 2017. Retrieved 2017-07-19.

^ Park Hyeong-taek (June 29, 2017). "[SCํ˜„์žฅ] ํƒ‘, ๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ 4ํšŒ ํก์—ฐ ์‹œ์ธ๏ฟฝ"๊ณต์†Œ์‚ฌ์‹ค ๋ชจ๋‘ ์ธ์ •"" [[SC scene] Top, smoking four po ... "All the facts of the charges"]. Sports Chosun (in Korean). Retrieved July 19, 2017.

^ Riddhiman Mukhopadhyay (July 20, 2017). "Rapper T.O.P sentenced at final trial: Apologizes to fans for his actions". International Business Times. Retrieved July 21, 2017.

^ "(LEAD) BIGBANG's T.O.P. gets suspended sentence for marijuana use". Yonhap News Agency. July 20, 2017. Retrieved July 20, 2017.

^ "๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์žฌ๋ณต๋ฌด์‹ฌ์‚ฌ์—์„œ ๋ถ€์ ํ•ฉ ๊ฒฐ๋ก ๏ฟฝ ์˜๊ฒฝ์‹ ๋ถ„ ๋ฐ•ํƒˆ" [Big Bang tower is inadequate in re-examination ... Deprivation of state]. Sports Chosun (in Korean). July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "BIGBANG's T.O.P to lose police post after drug conviction". Yonhap News Agency. July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ ์‹ ๋ถ„ ๋ฐ•ํƒˆ '์žฌ๋ณต๋ฌด ์‹ฌ์‚ฌ์„œ ๋ถ€์ ํ•ฉ ํŒ์ •'" [Top, disqualification of state of rehabilitation]. Starin E-Daily (in Korean). July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "BigBang rapper T.O.P cannot continue serving military duty as a policeman". Starits Times. July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

Exter

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Date: November 15th, 2018 1:13 AM
Author: Demanding gold center

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

^ "๋ณ‘์—ญ์ดํ–‰์•ˆ๋‚ด - ๊ฐœ์š”(์ด๊ด„)" [Military Service Implementation Guide - General Overview]. Military Manpower Organization (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-12-28.

^ a b Lee, Namhee (2007). The Making of Minjung: Democracy and the Politics of Representation in South Korea. Cornell University Press. p. 91. ISBN 0801445663.

^ "S. Korea to expand women's role in military". Yonhap News Agency. 2017-12-20. Retrieved 2017-12-28.

^ "Constitution of the Republic of Korea" (PDF). 1987. p. 12. Retrieved 2017-12-27.

^ Kim, Jongcheol (2012). "Constitutional Law". Introduction to Korean Law. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 78. ISBN 3642316891.

^ a b "Military Service Act, Article 8". Korean Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

^ "History". Military Manpower Administration. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

^ "Military Service Act, Article 5". Korean Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

^ "Military Service Act, Articles 10-14". Korean Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

^ Lent, Jesse (2016-04-01). "'Descendants Of The Sun' Star Song Joong Ki Discusses His Time In The South Korean Army". Korea Portal. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "Military Service Act, Article 18". Korea Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "Military Service Act, Articles 26-43". Korea Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "Conscription 'Should Be Phased Out Slowly'". Chosun Ilbo. 2010-07-06. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ Kim, Christine (2010-12-22). "Plan to cut compulsory military service scrapped". Korea JoongAng Daily. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "์ œ68์กฐ์˜11(์˜ˆ์ˆ ใ†์ฒด์œก์š”์›์˜ ์ถ”์ฒœ ๋“ฑ) [Article 68-11: Recommendation of arts and sports personnel, etc.]". ๋ณ‘์—ญ๋ฒ• ์‹œํ–‰๋ น [Military Service Act Implementation Rules]. South Korea: Ministry of Government Legislation. 29 November 2016. Retrieved 6 April 2018. ๋ฒ• ์ œ33์กฐ์˜7์ œ1ํ•ญ ์ „๋‹จ์—์„œ "๋Œ€ํ†ต๋ น๋ น์œผ๋กœ ์ •ํ•˜๋Š” ์˜ˆ์ˆ ·์ฒด์œก ๋ถ„์•ผ์˜ ํŠน๊ธฐ๋ฅผ ๊ฐ€์ง„ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ"์ด๋ž€ ๋‹ค์Œ ๊ฐ ํ˜ธ์˜ ์–ด๋Š ํ•˜๋‚˜์— ํ•ด๋‹นํ•˜๋Š” ์‚ฌ๋žŒ์„ ๋งํ•œ๋‹ค. ... 4. ์˜ฌ๋ฆผํ”ฝ๋Œ€ํšŒ์—์„œ 3์œ„ ์ด์ƒ์œผ๋กœ ์ž…์ƒํ•œ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ(๋‹จ์ฒด๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ์ข…๋ชฉ์˜ ๊ฒฝ์šฐ์—๋Š” ์‹ค์ œ๋กœ ์ถœ์ „ํ•œ ์„ ์ˆ˜๋งŒ ํ•ด๋‹นํ•œ๋‹ค) 5. ์•„์‹œ์•„๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ๋Œ€ํšŒ์—์„œ 1์œ„๋กœ ์ž…์ƒํ•œ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ(๋‹จ์ฒด๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ์ข…๋ชฉ์˜ ๊ฒฝ์šฐ์—๋Š” ์‹ค์ œ๋กœ ์ถœ์ „ํ•œ ์„ ์ˆ˜๋งŒ ํ•ด๋‹นํ•œ๋‹ค). [In Article 33, Paragraph 7, Subparagraph 2 of the Act, 'a person having special talents in arts and athletics fields, as defined by presidential order' refers to persons to whom are applicable any one of the provisions of the following subparagraphs. ... 4. A person who received a prize for ranked third or above at the Olympics (in the case of team events, only applicable to athletes who actually participated). 5. A person who received a prize for ranking first at the Asian Games (in the case of team events, only applicable to athletes who actually participated).]

^ "๋ฆฌ์šฐ์—์„œ๋„ ๋– ์˜ค๋ฅธ ์ถ•๊ตฌ๋Œ€ํ‘œํŒ€ '๋ณ‘์—ญํŠน๋ก€'".

^ "Footballer to Be Spared Military Service Despite IOC Probe". Chosun Ilbo. 14 August 2012. Retrieved 2 October 2012.

^ "Medal instead of military service". The Hankyoreh. 11 August 2012. Retrieved 25 February 2013.

^ "๋“ค์ญ‰๋‚ ์ญ‰ ๋ณ‘์—ญํŠน๋ก€๊ธฐ์ค€ 'ํ˜•ํ‰์„ฑ' ๋…ผ๋ž€๏ฟฝ๋ณ‘๋ฌด์ฒญ '๋ˆ„์ ์ ์ˆ˜์ œ' ์ถ”์ง„" (in Korean). Yonhap News Agency. September 30, 2016.

^ "Park Tae-hwan Enters Army Boot Camp". Chosun Ilbo. 5 October 2012. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ "Star Swimmer Says Army Boot Camp Helped Him Grow". Chosun Ilbo. 1 November 2012. Retrieved 4 April 2013.

^ "Hyeon Chung Participates In Korean Military Training - ATP World Tour - Tennis - ATP World Tour - Tennis".

^ ๊ณต๋ฌด์›๋ณด์ˆ˜๊ทœ์ • '๋ณ„ํ‘œ 13' ๊ตฐ์ธ์˜ ๋ด‰๊ธ‰ํ‘œ(์ œ5์กฐ ๋ฐ ๋ณ„ํ‘œ 1 ๊ด€๋ จ) . Korea Ministry of Government Legislation (in Korean). Retrieved 28 April 2015.

^ ์กฐ, ๊ธฐํ˜ธ (18 July 2012). "์šด๋™ํ™” ํ•œ ์ผค๋ ˆ ๋ชป ์ฃผ๋Š” ๊ตฐ(่ป)!". Seoul Broadcasting System. Retrieved 4 August 2012.

^ "[๋ณด๋„์ž๋ฃŒ] ์˜ˆ์‚ฐ ์—†๋‹ค๋˜ ๊ตญ๋ฐฉ๋ถ€, ์‚ฌ๊ด€์ƒ๋„์—๊ฒŒ๋Š” ๊ณ ๊ฐ€ ์™ธ๊ตญ๋ธŒ๋žœ๋“œ ์šด๋™ํ™” ์ง€๊ธ‰". Retrieved 4 August 2012.[dead link]

^ "FAQs-Dual Citizens | U.S. Embassy & Consulate in Korea". U.S. Embassy & Consulate in Korea. Retrieved 2017-10-12.

^ "South Korean singer Rain reports for military service". BBC News. 11 October 2011. Retrieved 2011-10-14.

^ Park, Eun-jee (16 January 2013). "Military service mischief a losing battle". Joongang Daily. Archived from the original on 29 June 2013. Retrieved 4 April 2013.

^ Seo, Ji-eun "Steve Yoo isn๏ฟฝt coming back to Korea" Archived 6 January 2013 at the Wayback Machine. Joongang Daily. 20 October 2011. retrieved 2011-11-08

^ (in Korean) "์ตœ์ง€์šฐ, '์Šนํ—Œ์ด์—๊ฒŒ ๋ง ๊ฑธ์–ด๋ณผ๊นŒ?"[permanent dead link] SSTV. 30 June 2009. Retrieved 2011-11-06

^ "Song Seung-heon, Jang Hyeok Discharged from Military" HanCinema. 16 November 2011. Retrieved 2011-10-14

^ (in Korean) "Song Seung-heon discharged from the army"Yahoo News Korea, 2006-11-18. Archived 14 June 2011 at the Wayback Machine.

^ "Rapper Gets Suspended Jail Term for Draft Dodging" Chosun Ilbo. 12 April 2011. Retrieved 2011-10-14

^ "KBS, MBC release list of 36 banned entertainers" Dong-A Ilbo. 28 September 2011. 2011-10-14

^ Sunwoo, Carla (22 June 2012). "Actor Kim Moo-yul was poor enough to dodge military service". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 27 January 2013. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ Lee, In-kyung (21 June 2012). "Kim Moo Yul Involved in Military Scandal after Avoiding Duties". enewsWorld. Retrieved 2012-10-06.

^ "High-Paid Actor Exempted from Draft for Poverty". The Chosun Ilbo. 22 June 2012. Retrieved 2012-10-06.

^ Moon, Gwang-lip (25 June 2012). "Agent says Kim Moo-yul's family situation was 'nearly impossible'". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 11 August 2012. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ Sunwoo, Carla (10 July 2012). "Kim Moo-yul kicked off movie set". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 26 January 2013. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ Sunwoo, Carla (11 July 2012). "Choi Daniel to replace Kim Moo-yul". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 5 August 2012. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ Lee, Hye-ji (5 October 2012). "Kim Moo-yeol to Enter Army, Cleaning out Exemption Rumors". 10Asia. Retrieved 2012-11-18.

^ Sunwoo, Carla (11 October 2011). "Kim Moo-yul enlists after rumors". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 26 October 2012. Retrieved 18 November 2012.

^ "BIGBANG's T.O.P confirms military enlistment date". Yibada. November 22, 2016.

^ "The Full Story Behind T.O.P's Drug Scandal, And The Mysterious Trainee Woman". June 2, 2017. Retrieved June 8, 2017.

^ Jun, R. "BIGBANG's T.O.P To Be Dismissed From Duty For Duration of Prosecution". Soompi. Retrieved 8 June 2017.

^ "Medical expert comments on T.O.P's benzodiazepine overdose | allkpop.com". allkpop. Retrieved 2017-06-09.

^ "BIGBANG's T.O.P hospitalized for drug overdose". YonhapNews. June 6, 2017. Retrieved June 6, 2017.

^ "K-pop superstar T.O.P. in intensive care after overdose". BBC. June 8, 2017. Retrieved June 28, 2017.

^ Kim Jung-kyoon (June 30, 2017). "T.O.P admits to all charges at first hearing". Korea JoongAng Daily. Retrieved July 19, 2017.

^ "Big Bang's T.O.P pleads guilty to pot charges". The Jakarta Post. June 30, 2017. Retrieved 2017-07-19.

^ Park Hyeong-taek (June 29, 2017). "[SCํ˜„์žฅ] ํƒ‘, ๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ 4ํšŒ ํก์—ฐ ์‹œ์ธ๏ฟฝ"๊ณต์†Œ์‚ฌ์‹ค ๋ชจ๋‘ ์ธ์ •"" [[SC scene] Top, smoking four po ... "All the facts of the charges"]. Sports Chosun (in Korean). Retrieved July 19, 2017.

^ Riddhiman Mukhopadhyay (July 20, 2017). "Rapper T.O.P sentenced at final trial: Apologizes to fans for his actions". International Business Times. Retrieved July 21, 2017.

^ "(LEAD) BIGBANG's T.O.P. gets suspended sentence for marijuana use". Yonhap News Agency. July 20, 2017. Retrieved July 20, 2017.

^ "๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์žฌ๋ณต๋ฌด์‹ฌ์‚ฌ์—์„œ ๋ถ€์ ํ•ฉ ๊ฒฐ๋ก ๏ฟฝ ์˜๊ฒฝ์‹ ๋ถ„ ๋ฐ•ํƒˆ" [Big Bang tower is inadequate in re-examination ... Deprivation of state]. Sports Chosun (in Korean). July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "BIGBANG's T.O.P to lose police post after drug conviction". Yonhap News Agency. July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ ์‹ ๋ถ„ ๋ฐ•ํƒˆ '์žฌ๋ณต๋ฌด ์‹ฌ์‚ฌ์„œ ๋ถ€์ ํ•ฉ ํŒ์ •'" [Top, disqualification of state of rehabilitation]. Starin E-Daily (in Korean). July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "BigBang rapper T.O.P cannot continue serving military duty as a policeman". Starits Times. July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recognised in South Korea.[62] Usually, over 400 people are imprisoned at any one time for refusing military service, for political or religious reasons. This is contrary to international human rights standards and the government of Korea have been repeatedly criticised for not allowing those whose conscience prevents them from joining the military to undertake some kind of substitute service, rather than imprisoning them.

See also Edit

Republic of Korea Armed Forces

Republic of Korea Army

Republic of Korea Marine Corps

Republic of Korea Navy

Republic of Korea Air Force

References Edit

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^ a b Lee, Namhee (2007). The Making of Minjung: Democracy and the Politics of Representation in South Korea. Cornell University Press. p. 91. ISBN 0801445663.

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^ "Constitution of the Republic of Korea" (PDF). 1987. p. 12. Retrieved 2017-12-27.

^ Kim, Jongcheol (2012). "Constitutional Law". Introduction to Korean Law. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 78. ISBN 3642316891.

^ a b "Military Service Act, Article 8". Korean Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

^ "History". Military Manpower Administration. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

^ "Military Service Act, Article 5". Korean Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

^ "Military Service Act, Articles 10-14". Korean Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-29.

^ Lent, Jesse (2016-04-01). "'Descendants Of The Sun' Star Song Joong Ki Discusses His Time In The South Korean Army". Korea Portal. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "Military Service Act, Article 18". Korea Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "Military Service Act, Articles 26-43". Korea Legislation Research Institute. Archived from the original on 2017-04-16. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "Conscription 'Should Be Phased Out Slowly'". Chosun Ilbo. 2010-07-06. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ Kim, Christine (2010-12-22). "Plan to cut compulsory military service scrapped". Korea JoongAng Daily. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

^ "์ œ68์กฐ์˜11(์˜ˆ์ˆ ใ†์ฒด์œก์š”์›์˜ ์ถ”์ฒœ ๋“ฑ) [Article 68-11: Recommendation of arts and sports personnel, etc.]". ๋ณ‘์—ญ๋ฒ• ์‹œํ–‰๋ น [Military Service Act Implementation Rules]. South Korea: Ministry of Government Legislation. 29 November 2016. Retrieved 6 April 2018. ๋ฒ• ์ œ33์กฐ์˜7์ œ1ํ•ญ ์ „๋‹จ์—์„œ "๋Œ€ํ†ต๋ น๋ น์œผ๋กœ ์ •ํ•˜๋Š” ์˜ˆ์ˆ ·์ฒด์œก ๋ถ„์•ผ์˜ ํŠน๊ธฐ๋ฅผ ๊ฐ€์ง„ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ"์ด๋ž€ ๋‹ค์Œ ๊ฐ ํ˜ธ์˜ ์–ด๋Š ํ•˜๋‚˜์— ํ•ด๋‹นํ•˜๋Š” ์‚ฌ๋žŒ์„ ๋งํ•œ๋‹ค. ... 4. ์˜ฌ๋ฆผํ”ฝ๋Œ€ํšŒ์—์„œ 3์œ„ ์ด์ƒ์œผ๋กœ ์ž…์ƒํ•œ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ(๋‹จ์ฒด๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ์ข…๋ชฉ์˜ ๊ฒฝ์šฐ์—๋Š” ์‹ค์ œ๋กœ ์ถœ์ „ํ•œ ์„ ์ˆ˜๋งŒ ํ•ด๋‹นํ•œ๋‹ค) 5. ์•„์‹œ์•„๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ๋Œ€ํšŒ์—์„œ 1์œ„๋กœ ์ž…์ƒํ•œ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ(๋‹จ์ฒด๊ฒฝ๊ธฐ์ข…๋ชฉ์˜ ๊ฒฝ์šฐ์—๋Š” ์‹ค์ œ๋กœ ์ถœ์ „ํ•œ ์„ ์ˆ˜๋งŒ ํ•ด๋‹นํ•œ๋‹ค). [In Article 33, Paragraph 7, Subparagraph 2 of the Act, 'a person having special talents in arts and athletics fields, as defined by presidential order' refers to persons to whom are applicable any one of the provisions of the following subparagraphs. ... 4. A person who received a prize for ranked third or above at the Olympics (in the case of team events, only applicable to athletes who actually participated). 5. A person who received a prize for ranking first at the Asian Games (in the case of team events, only applicable to athletes who actually participated).]

^ "๋ฆฌ์šฐ์—์„œ๋„ ๋– ์˜ค๋ฅธ ์ถ•๊ตฌ๋Œ€ํ‘œํŒ€ '๋ณ‘์—ญํŠน๋ก€'".

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^ "๋“ค์ญ‰๋‚ ์ญ‰ ๋ณ‘์—ญํŠน๋ก€๊ธฐ์ค€ 'ํ˜•ํ‰์„ฑ' ๋…ผ๋ž€๏ฟฝ๋ณ‘๋ฌด์ฒญ '๋ˆ„์ ์ ์ˆ˜์ œ' ์ถ”์ง„" (in Korean). Yonhap News Agency. September 30, 2016.

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^ "Star Swimmer Says Army Boot Camp Helped Him Grow". Chosun Ilbo. 1 November 2012. Retrieved 4 April 2013.

^ "Hyeon Chung Participates In Korean Military Training - ATP World Tour - Tennis - ATP World Tour - Tennis".

^ ๊ณต๋ฌด์›๋ณด์ˆ˜๊ทœ์ • '๋ณ„ํ‘œ 13' ๊ตฐ์ธ์˜ ๋ด‰๊ธ‰ํ‘œ(์ œ5์กฐ ๋ฐ ๋ณ„ํ‘œ 1 ๊ด€๋ จ) . Korea Ministry of Government Legislation (in Korean). Retrieved 28 April 2015.

^ ์กฐ, ๊ธฐํ˜ธ (18 July 2012). "์šด๋™ํ™” ํ•œ ์ผค๋ ˆ ๋ชป ์ฃผ๋Š” ๊ตฐ(่ป)!". Seoul Broadcasting System. Retrieved 4 August 2012.

^ "[๋ณด๋„์ž๋ฃŒ] ์˜ˆ์‚ฐ ์—†๋‹ค๋˜ ๊ตญ๋ฐฉ๋ถ€, ์‚ฌ๊ด€์ƒ๋„์—๊ฒŒ๋Š” ๊ณ ๊ฐ€ ์™ธ๊ตญ๋ธŒ๋žœ๋“œ ์šด๋™ํ™” ์ง€๊ธ‰". Retrieved 4 August 2012.[dead link]

^ "FAQs-Dual Citizens | U.S. Embassy & Consulate in Korea". U.S. Embassy & Consulate in Korea. Retrieved 2017-10-12.

^ "South Korean singer Rain reports for military service". BBC News. 11 October 2011. Retrieved 2011-10-14.

^ Park, Eun-jee (16 January 2013). "Military service mischief a losing battle". Joongang Daily. Archived from the original on 29 June 2013. Retrieved 4 April 2013.

^ Seo, Ji-eun "Steve Yoo isn๏ฟฝt coming back to Korea" Archived 6 January 2013 at the Wayback Machine. Joongang Daily. 20 October 2011. retrieved 2011-11-08

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^ "Rapper Gets Suspended Jail Term for Draft Dodging" Chosun Ilbo. 12 April 2011. Retrieved 2011-10-14

^ "KBS, MBC release list of 36 banned entertainers" Dong-A Ilbo. 28 September 2011. 2011-10-14

^ Sunwoo, Carla (22 June 2012). "Actor Kim Moo-yul was poor enough to dodge military service". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 27 January 2013. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ Lee, In-kyung (21 June 2012). "Kim Moo Yul Involved in Military Scandal after Avoiding Duties". enewsWorld. Retrieved 2012-10-06.

^ "High-Paid Actor Exempted from Draft for Poverty". The Chosun Ilbo. 22 June 2012. Retrieved 2012-10-06.

^ Moon, Gwang-lip (25 June 2012). "Agent says Kim Moo-yul's family situation was 'nearly impossible'". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 11 August 2012. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ Sunwoo, Carla (10 July 2012). "Kim Moo-yul kicked off movie set". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 26 January 2013. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ Sunwoo, Carla (11 July 2012). "Choi Daniel to replace Kim Moo-yul". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 5 August 2012. Retrieved 6 October 2012.

^ Lee, Hye-ji (5 October 2012). "Kim Moo-yeol to Enter Army, Cleaning out Exemption Rumors". 10Asia. Retrieved 2012-11-18.

^ Sunwoo, Carla (11 October 2011). "Kim Moo-yul enlists after rumors". Korea JoongAng Daily. Archived from the original on 26 October 2012. Retrieved 18 November 2012.

^ "BIGBANG's T.O.P confirms military enlistment date". Yibada. November 22, 2016.

^ "The Full Story Behind T.O.P's Drug Scandal, And The Mysterious Trainee Woman". June 2, 2017. Retrieved June 8, 2017.

^ Jun, R. "BIGBANG's T.O.P To Be Dismissed From Duty For Duration of Prosecution". Soompi. Retrieved 8 June 2017.

^ "Medical expert comments on T.O.P's benzodiazepine overdose | allkpop.com". allkpop. Retrieved 2017-06-09.

^ "BIGBANG's T.O.P hospitalized for drug overdose". YonhapNews. June 6, 2017. Retrieved June 6, 2017.

^ "K-pop superstar T.O.P. in intensive care after overdose". BBC. June 8, 2017. Retrieved June 28, 2017.

^ Kim Jung-kyoon (June 30, 2017). "T.O.P admits to all charges at first hearing". Korea JoongAng Daily. Retrieved July 19, 2017.

^ "Big Bang's T.O.P pleads guilty to pot charges". The Jakarta Post. June 30, 2017. Retrieved 2017-07-19.

^ Park Hyeong-taek (June 29, 2017). "[SCํ˜„์žฅ] ํƒ‘, ๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ 4ํšŒ ํก์—ฐ ์‹œ์ธ๏ฟฝ"๊ณต์†Œ์‚ฌ์‹ค ๋ชจ๋‘ ์ธ์ •"" [[SC scene] Top, smoking four po ... "All the facts of the charges"]. Sports Chosun (in Korean). Retrieved July 19, 2017.

^ Riddhiman Mukhopadhyay (July 20, 2017). "Rapper T.O.P sentenced at final trial: Apologizes to fans for his actions". International Business Times. Retrieved July 21, 2017.

^ "(LEAD) BIGBANG's T.O.P. gets suspended sentence for marijuana use". Yonhap News Agency. July 20, 2017. Retrieved July 20, 2017.

^ "๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์žฌ๋ณต๋ฌด์‹ฌ์‚ฌ์—์„œ ๋ถ€์ ํ•ฉ ๊ฒฐ๋ก ๏ฟฝ ์˜๊ฒฝ์‹ ๋ถ„ ๋ฐ•ํƒˆ" [Big Bang tower is inadequate in re-examination ... Deprivation of state]. Sports Chosun (in Korean). July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "BIGBANG's T.O.P to lose police post after drug conviction". Yonhap News Agency. July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ ์‹ ๋ถ„ ๋ฐ•ํƒˆ '์žฌ๋ณต๋ฌด ์‹ฌ์‚ฌ์„œ ๋ถ€์ ํ•ฉ ํŒ์ •'" [Top, disqualification of state of rehabilitation]. Starin E-Daily (in Korean). July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ "BigBang rapper T.O.P cannot continue serving military duty as a policeman". Starits Times. July 31, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.

^ Lee Young-jae (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ํก์—ฐ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜๊ฒฝ์—์„œ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด ์š”์› ๋๋‹ค". Korea JoongAng Daily (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Ji-heon (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ' ๋น…๋ฑ… ํƒ‘, ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์˜๊ฒฝ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ๊ทผ๋ฌด". Yonhap News Agency (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Kim Yoo-jin (August 28, 2017). "'๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ๋…ผ๋ž€' ํƒ‘, ๋ณด์ถฉ์—ญ ํ†ต๋ณด๋ฐ›๊ณ  ์˜ค๋Š˜ ์ „์—ญ๏ฟฝ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ ์ „ํ™˜". Herald Economy (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ Hae Kyung Heon (August 28, 2017). "๋Œ€๋งˆ์ดˆ ์ง‘์œ ํŒ๊ฒฐ ํƒ‘ ๊ฒฐ๊ตญ ์‚ฌํšŒ๋ณต๋ฌด์š”์›์œผ๋กœ, ๋ˆ„๋ฆฌ๊พผ ๋ฐ˜์‘ '๋ƒ‰๋žญ'". Sports Khan (in Korean). Retrieved 2017-08-29.

^ "Country report and updates: Korea, South - War Resisters' International". www.wri-irg.org.

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Date: November 15th, 2018 1:16 AM
Author: Demanding gold center

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Conscription in South Korea

Conscription in South Korea has existed since 1957 and requires male citizens between the ages of 18 and 35 to perform about two years of compulsory military service.[1][2] Women are not required to perform military service, but may voluntarily enlist.[3]

Establishment Edit

The basis for military conscription in South Korea is the Constitution of the Republic of Korea, which was promulgated on July 17, 1948. The constitution states in Article 39, "All citizens shall have the duty of national defense under the conditions as prescribed by Act."[4][5] The Military Service Act of 1949, which was implemented in 1957, specified that compulsory military service is required for men ages 18 or older.[6][2] Conscription is managed by the Military Manpower Administration, which was created in 1948.[7]

Requirements Edit

Enlistment and physical exam Edit

By law, when a Korean man turns 18 years old, he is enlisted for "first citizen service," meaning he is liable for military duty, but is not yet required to serve.[6][8] When he turns 19 years old (or, in some instances, 20 years old), he is required to undergo a physical exam to determine whether he is suitable for military service. The table below shows the physical exam's possible grades and their outcomes, according to the Military Service Act.[9]

Grade Description Outcome

1, 2, 3, 4 "Those whose physical and psychological constitution is healthy enough to perform active or supplemental service." "To be enlisted for active duty service, supplemental service or the second citizen service, based on their qualifications, such as educational background and age."

5 "Those incapable of entering active or supplemental service, but capable of entering the second citizen service." "To be enlisted for the second citizen service."

6 "Those incapable of performing military service due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To be exempted from military service."

7 "Those unable to be graded...due to any disease or mental or physical incompetence." "To undergo a follow-up physical examination" within two years.

Service types and length Edit

The length of compulsory military service in South Korea varies based on military branch.[10] Active duty soldiers serve 21 months in the Army or Marine Corps, 23 months in the Navy, and 24 months in the Air Force.[11] After conscripts finish their military service, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for 6 years.[citation needed]

Non-active duty personnel, or "supplemental service" personnel serve for various lengths: 24 months for social work personnel or international cooperation service personnel; 34 months for arts and sports personnel or industrial technical personnel; and 36 months for public health doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, or expert researchers.[12]

South Korea currently has among the longest military service periods in the world, ranked behind Israel, Singapore, and North Korea.[citation needed] In 2010, there was growing public pressure to either shorten the length of conscription or to switch to voluntary military service, and calls from experts for a gradual phasing out of conscription rather than complete abolition.[13] However, in December 2010, after taking into consideration of the 2010 ROKS Cheonan sinking and Bombardment of Yeonpyeong incidents, the South Korean government said it would not reduce service periods.[14]

Exemptions for Olympic medalists Edit

Current conscription regulations stipulate that athletes who win medals in the Olympic Games or gold medals in the Asian Games are granted exemptions from military service and are placed in Grade 4.[15] They are required to do four weeks of basic military training and engage in sports field for 34 months. After that, they are automatically placed on the reserve roster, and are obligated to attend a few days of annual military training for six years. In practice, after athletes finish their four weeks of basic military training, they are able to continue their own sports career during the 34 months of duty.[16]

Notable athletes who have been granted exemptions from military service are the bronze medal-winning football team at the 2012 Summer Olympics,[17][18] 2008 Olympic gold medalists badminton player Lee Yong-dae[19] and swimmer Park Tae-hwan[20][21] and 2014 Asian Games gold medalist tennis player Hyeon Chung.[22]

Compensation Edit

The following data is from 'Regulation on Public Servant Compensation', implemented on 1 January 2017.[23] Exchange rate as of 2 May 2018 (โ‚ฉ1077 to $1.00USD)

Private (์ด๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Private first class (์ผ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Corporal (์ƒ๋“ฑ๋ณ‘) Sergeant (๋ณ‘์žฅ)

โ‚ฉ163,000

$151.35 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ176,400

$163.79 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ195,000

$181.06 (approx) per month โ‚ฉ216,000

$200.56 (approx) per month

Equipment Edit

The Ministry of National Defense has revealed that it has failed to provide sneakers to 7,411 recruits who joined the military from 22 May to 4 June 2012, after the budget was insufficient for need. The Defense ministry originally projected the cost of each pair of sneakers to be 11,000 KRW. However, the actual cost turned out to be 15,000 KRW.[24]

The office of National Assembly member Kim Kwang-jin of Democratic United Party revealed that cadets in Korea Military Academy were provided with sneakers worth 60,000 KRW and tennis shoes. Cadets in Korea Army Academy at Yeongcheon were provided with sneakers worth 64,250 KRW, in addition to running shoes and soccer shoes.[25]

Dual citizens Edit

For dual citizens, or those with multiple citizenships, male South Koreans must choose their citizenship by the time they turn 18, before March 31 of that year. If these males choose to revoke their South Korean citizenship, they will not be required to complete their mandatory military service. However, if they fail to choose their citizenship by their 18th year, they will be subjected to fulfill their mandatory military service.[26] If males choose to renounce their citizenship by their 18th year, they are ineligible to gain a Korean work visa (F series) until after they turn 40 years of age. It may still be possible to gain an E series visa.

Controversies Edit

The South Korean public is sensitive towards the country's mandatory military service, but also has a low tolerance towards those who attempt to dodge or receive special treatment, especially after scandals of wealthy families caught trying to avoid their national duty. Those found or accused of draft dodging and negligence of duty often face harsh penalties and public backlash. According to Ha Jae-keun, a South Korean pop columnist, "The mood against draft-dodgers and negligence of duty is so hostile that nowadays entertainers feel it's better to get it over and done with".[27][28]

Steve Yoo Edit

In 2002, right before Korean American pop singer Steve Yoo was due to be drafted for his military service, he gave up his Korean nationality and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He was born in Seoul and migrated to the United States at the age of 13. The South Korean government considered it an act of desertion and deported him, banning him from entering the country permanently.[29]

Song Seung-heon Edit

In late 2004, it was revealed that actor Song Seung-heon had avoided his draft by taking medication to fail the military physical examination. Song had previously been exempted by claiming to have severe diabetes and high blood pressure, but that was found by the South Korean government to be false.[30] Amidst press coverage and public outcry, Song publicly apologized and agreed to immediately serve his two-year term in the military. Song was discharged on 15 November 2006 with the rank of Corporal.[31][32]

MC Mong Edit

On 11 April 2011, rapper MC Mong was cleared of intentionally pulling out healthy teeth to be exempted from military duty but was sentenced to a suspended jail term of 6 months, probation for one year, and 120 hours of community service, for deliberately delaying enlistment on false grounds.[33] The court acknowledged that there was a delay in his military enlistment; however, they were unable to determine whether he was guilty of extracting teeth for the purpose of avoiding his military draft. In September 2011, it was reported that Mong has been banned by Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) and Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) from appearing in its TV shows, for draft dodging.[34]

Kim Mu-yeol Edit

In June 2012 Kim Mu-yeol came under growing public criticism over allegations he dodged his compulsory military service. In a report released by the Korean Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI), Kim was deemed fit to serve in active duty as a level two recruit after a March 2001 physical examination. However, throughout 2007 to 2009, Kim was granted postponement on the grounds that he was taking civil service examinations or had been admitted to a work training facility, neither of which took place. During this time he reportedly earned approximately โ‚ฉ300 million from films, musicals and television work. In December 2009, he received his final notice for enlistment, having used up the 730 days allowed for postponement. He submitted a request to change his military status in January 2010 because of a knee injury, which was rejected. Finally, a valid exemption was granted on the grounds that he was a "low-income individual" and the sole provider for his family. BAI's contention was that Kim's income is substantially higher than the standard for disqualification due to poverty; thus, the Military Manpower Administration was negligent in their duties by granting the exemption.[35][36][37]

Kim's agency Prain TPC defended him, stating that Kim had been supporting his family by working as a security guard, construction worker and at a mobile phone factory since his late teens. When his father collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, the treatments incurred a lot of debt for the family. Their worsening financial condition caused them to become totally dependent on Kim, resulting in his said filing for an exemption in 2010.[38] Given the publicity, a reinvestigation into the case was launched and Kim was asked by the production company to leave the film 11 A.M. (he was replaced by Choi Daniel).[39][40] On 4 October 2012, Kim released a statement that though there was no wrongdoing on his part, he had decided to voluntarily enter the army "to recover his honor damaged by the rumors."[41][42]

T.O.P Edit

T.O.P began his two-year mandatory military service on February 9, 2017 as a conscripted police officer, where he was set to be discharged on November 8, 2018 after completing the requirements.[43] However, it was announced in June that he would be prosecuted without detention for use of marijuana.[44] He was subsequently transferred to a different police division to await notice of prosecution, and was suspended from police duty pending verdict on his case.[45] A few days after the announcement, T.O.P was found unconscious in police barracks due to a suspected anti-anxiety medicine overdose of prescribed benzodiazepine,[46] and was hospitalized.[47] On June 8, T.O.P's mother confirmed that her son had opened his eyes and was recovering.[48]

On June 29, T.O.P faced his first trial for the marijuana usage charges at the Seoul Central District Court.[49] He pleaded guilty to the charges against him and admitted that he did smoke marijuana on two out of the four instances.[50] T.O.P received two years of probation, with a possibility of ten months' jail time if he violates any terms.[51] At the second court hearing the following month, T.O.P was sentenced to 10 months in prison suspended for two years for illegal marijuana use.[52] He acknowledged all guilty charges. After undergoing a disciplinary review by the police to decide if T.O.P could return as a conscripted policeman or will complete his service as a public service officer,[53] the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency reviewed T.O.P's current condition and decided T.O.P is unfit to resume service in his previous position.[54][55] A request was made to Army headquarters for a new position for T.O.P to determine either to serve as a public service worker of a full-time reserve soldier to complete his mandatory service.[56][57] T.O.P was eventually assigned reservist status by the Ministry of National Defense and transferred from police department.[58] He will complete his mandatory service as a public service worker.[59] The time T.O.P had been dismissed from duty during his prosecution will not count towards his total service.[60][61]

Conscientious objection Edit

The right to conscientious objection is not recogni